Saturday, April 30, 2022

Easter 3

 John 21:1-14

This is now the third appearance of the risen Christ to His disciples. The setting is simple. Jesus appears amidst the everyday occupations of a fisherman.

He performs a miracle, in which they recognize Him as the Lord. Once again, Jesus shows that He is concerned for us in our everyday lives.

Peter is so overjoyed when He recognizes Jesus that he immediately swims to shore. The disciples eat breakfast with Jesus, the account once again proving the bodily resurrection of our Lord, as ghosts simply do not eat food. Truly, there is joy for the disciples in meeting the risen Christ.

How satisfied are you with your life? Interesting question isn’t it? Consider the disciples of Jesus. They had given so much to the cause of Christ. They had followed Him for years; sacrificing career choices, family commitments, and their status among peers.

And for what? They had seen Him die and then rise again. But where did that leave them? Peter the (concernment) spokesperson for the disciples says to his friends, “I’m going fishing”, as if to say “I’ve had enough…I’m going back to a life and a world that is at least predictable.” Peter was looking for a life that was safe, secure, sheltered

Where do you find yourself today? Can you identify with these 1st Century followers of Jesus?  We see a contrast between life without Christ and life with Christ. This begs the question – are you living BC – before Christ, or AC – after Christ has come into your life.


1. BC – life before Christ entered your life – I’m going out to fish,” Simon Peter told them, and they said, “We’ll go with you.” So, they went out and got into the boat, but that night they caught nothing. Vv. 1-3

A.     This may describe a life of discouragement frustration and hopelessness – “I’m going fishing.”


     1. Peter and his friends had invested three years of their lives following the Savior. Those three years seemed to be a lifetime.

     2. But what had that in investment of time produced? They had witnessed Jesus’ passion, suffering, death and resurrection. But what did it mean to them? Had there been a significant change in their lives? Peter was content to get back to a familiar way of living, his former life. “I’m going fishing.” The kingdom had not arrived, and they had to make a living. They were seeking a predictable life.

B. The result of such labor and effort – “he caught nothing” But the former life proved to be fruitless for Peter. His enthusiasm ended in frustration, for no fish were caught.


          1. What he thought would bring him contentment, joy, and peace lead to nothing.

2. He had nothing to show for all of his effort. All his labors were fruitless.

Transition: There was life for Peter before Christ entered his life. Notice his life after his encounter with Jesus.

2. AC – life after Christ enters your life – Vv. 4-14


A. There is a fruitfulness pm account of Christ.  A miracle of fish! 153 fish to be exact. Jesus originally called Peter after he had caught a great amount of fish. The Savior had said to him, “from now on you will catch men!” Once again, Peter is called into kingdom work. Now Peter is given a re-call. These are encouraging words for us to hear. Peter was given another chance. The Savior is the author of second chances. Peter who was content to drop out is re-instated. Having been recovered he is re- charged for future kingdom building.

B. The food - Jesus provides it – it is given to provide nurture, growth, and strength. Daily the Savior feeds us as He give us His Word not only to strengthen but to encourage us to go back to where we work and live to be witnesses for Him.

C. The Savior offers us an opportunity for fellowship, “Come and have breakfast” with Me! This is why you have come this day. To re-connect with the Savior; to have hear His voice, to be strengthened by His Word and Sacrament.

With a single-minded purpose, the Savior comes to His own to provide for them. Had He not come to these friends His cause would have been lost and His mission in vain. Peter experienced not only the Lord’s forgiveness but also the opportunity to be used by Him for a second time. May the Lord continue to use you to speak His word of peace in this world.

Words –790

Passive Sentences – 9%

Readability – 75.7

Reading Level – 5.5

 


[1] Jesus appears by the sea, Schnorr von Carolsfeld woodcuts © WELS permission granted for personal and congregational use


confirmation

 

Psalm 116:8-9
Delivered!

For you have delivered my soul from death my eyes from tears my feet from stumbling. I will walk before the LORD in the land of the living.

God of power and mercy, through the Passion and resurrection of Your Son You have freed us from the bonds of death and the anguish of separation from You. Be with us on our pilgrimage, and help us offer you ad sacrifice of praise, fulfill our vows, and glorify you in the presence of all your people through Jesus Christ our Lord.[2]

The words of the Psalm were sung by Jesus sand His disciples on the night of His betrayal and arrest. (Matthew 26:30; Mark 14:26)

We are moved by the thought that Jesus sang these words with His disciples on the night of His betrayal and arrest. Knowing all the suffering set before Him Jesus sang with confidence in spite of His coming death, His coming tears, and falling under the weight of the cross soon to come. 

These words are a song of thanksgiving, a poem; written after a difficult time in life that had been endured, survived, and overcome.

You do well to remember and bear witness to these times in which the LORD has been active in your daily life.  When you find yourselves in the midst of difficult times it is of utmost importance to remember that these times can be endure, survived and overcome due to the LORD’s care and provision.

The promise is that because of what the LORD does – listen to your prayers and supplications, answering your prayers and promising you life out of death, means simply that this life that you live today is transformed as well. That is worthy of our thanks and proclamation.

You love the LORD because the LORD delivers on His promises. And you keep the faith even in troubled times because the LORD delivers.

1.      He delivers you from a sentence of death.

You know the scripture well, “The wages of sin is death. “ (Romans 6:23a) That dying thief spoke correctly when he said to the other criminal. “Do you not fear God, since you are under the same sentence of condemnation? And we indeed justly, for we are receiving the due reward of our deeds, but this man has done nothing wrong.”  (Luke 23:40-41)

This is what St. Paul teaches when he says, “For all who have sinned without he Law will also perish without the law, and all who have sinned under the law will be judged by the law.” (Romans 2:2) “For all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God.” (Romans 3:23)  Every man and every woman; every boy, every girl - each person in this very room – we all find ourselves in the same boat. All have sinned. Weighed in the balances of the LORD’s perfect scales of justice; all are found wanting. Where shall we go to find clemency and healing?

Behold Christ’s cross.  He did this by Himself; suffering an unjust arrest by Himself being killed most unfairly. Jesus – the most righteous one – the only perfectly righteous one – He would be arrested, tried, and put to death when it was clear He was entirely not guilty.

On His cross, your sins became His. Your troubles - His burdens. He died your death only to rise again. Look to His cross for your every burden in life. As the world spins, the cross stands!

Tell others your pain; you won’t receive the care you expect. Tell Jesus, and you’ll see He know your sorrows better than you do. Tell others your sins; they will litigate and judge you. Tell Jesus and see how He has taken them all away.

He did this for your, for you and for all the perplexed people of this world. Justice is done. All the wrongs and the sins are paid for. By Jesus ‘holy blood on the cross. Now your fears and your worries have a place to go to find answer. To the cross of Christ.

2.      The Lord delivers you from sorrow replacing it with pure just.

Trials might come. In fact, they will come. But remember the encouragement of St. Paul when he wrote: “No temptation has overcome you that is not common to man. God is faithful and He will not let you be tempted beyond your ability, but with the temptation he will also provide the way of escape, that you may be able to endure it.” (1 Corinthians 10:13)

Yes, challenges might come but they will be attended with help. For your destiny is to be with Christ in time and eternity. “He will wipe away every tear from their eyes and death shall be on more, neither shall there be mourning, nor crying, no0r pain anymore, for the former things have passed away.”  (Revelation 21:4)  

3.      The LORD has delivered you from stumbling giving you a firm foundation upon which to stand.

You walk in His wake as He orders your days and directs your path. With the psalmist we can say, “I waited patiently for the LORD, he inclined to me and heard my cry. He drew me up from the pit of destruction, out of the miry bog, and set my feet upon a rock, making my steps secure.” (Psalm 40:1-2)

4.      Thus, the Psalmist will say,I will walk before the LORD in the land of the living. “

These were the grateful words of the Psalmist after His deliverance. They were also the confident words sung in faith by Jesus and His disciples before every agony of the coming cross. So also, these words become your song. A refrain, which never ends. A hymn, which is eternal.

Jesus could go to the cross with full confidence that having been rescued from falling feet, He would once again walk in the land of the living.  Full of faith you trust in the LORD in every circumstance. Even in the depth of His distress, Jesus prayed this prayer in full confidence and faith. And by grace, and through faith so will you. For you know what faith stands for – “Forsaking all, I Trust Him.”

Fare thee well child of God. Fare the well! Godspeed and God Bless! In Jesus’ Name, I say this. Amen.  

Words – 1,095
Passive Sentences – 9%
Readability – 81.9%
Reading Level - 5.0  


[1] Luther’s Seal © Ed Riojas, Higher Things
[2] Collect for Psalm 116, For All the Saints, A Prayer Book For and By the Church, Vol. 1 © 1994 The American Lutheran Publicity Bureau, Delhi, NY

Friday, April 29, 2022

Saturday prior to Easter 3

 

The Hymn of the Day, With High Delight, Let Us Unite (LSB #483), continues the theme of joy in Christ’s resurrection. The whole Church on earth, together with those already in heaven, as we saw in the epistle, joins together in singing joyous songs of high praise to the risen Lord Jesus Christ, our salvation.

With high delight Let us unite
by George Vetter
1536-1599

Stanza 1
With high delight Let us unite
In songs of sweet jubilation.
You pure in heart, Each take your part,
Sing Jesus Christ, our salvation.
To set us free Forever, he
Is risen and sends To all earth's ends
Good news to save every nation.
 

Stanza 2
True God, he first From death has burst
Forth into life, all subduing.
His enemy Shall vanquished lie;
His death has been death's undoing.
"And yours shall be Like victory
O'er death and grave," Said he, who gave
His life for us, life renewing.

 

Stanza 3
Let praises ring; Give thanks, and bring
To Christ our Lord adoration.
His honor speed By word and deed
To every land, every nation.
So shall his love Give us above,
From misery And death set free,
All joy and full consolation.
-30 April, 2022


[1] Jesus Appears to His Disciples by the Sea, Schnorr Von Carolsfeld woodcuts  copyright © WELS for personal and congregational use


Thursday, April 28, 2022

Morning Prayer #128

 


Acts 3:1-10



Now Peter and John were going up to the temple at the hour of prayer, the ninth hour. [a] 2 And a man lame from birth was being carried, whom they laid daily at the gate of the temple that is called the Beautiful Gate to ask alms of those entering the temple. 3 Seeing Peter and John about to go into the temple, he asked to receive alms. 4 And Peter directed his gaze at him, as did John, and said, “Look at us.” 5 And he fixed his attention on them, expecting to receive something from them. 6 But Peter said, “I have no silver and gold, but what I do have I give to you. In the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth, rise up and walk!” 7 And he took him by the right hand and raised him up, and immediately his feet and ankles were made strong. 8 And leaping up, he stood and began to walk, and entered the temple with them, walking and leaping and praising God. 9 And all the people saw him walking and praising God, 10 and recognized him as the one who sat at the Beautiful Gate of the temple, asking for alms. And they were filled with wonder and amazement at what had happened to him.

 

Footnotes:

Acts 3:1 That is, 3 p.m.

 

The Holy Bible, English Standard Version. ESV® Text Edition: 2016. Copyright © 2001 by Crossway Bibles, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers.

 

Schnorr Von Carolsfeld woodcuts © WELS permission granted for personal and congregational use


Friday prior to Easter 3

 

John 21:1–14—This is the third appearance of the risen Christ to His disciples. The setting is simple, normal—Jesus appears amidst the everyday occupations of a fisherman. He performs a miracle, in which they recognize Him as the Lord. Once again, Jesus shows that He is concerned for us in our everyday lives. Peter is so overjoyed when He recognizes Jesus that he immediately swims to shore. The disciples eat breakfast with Jesus, the account once again proving the bodily resurrection of our Lord, as ghosts do not eat food. Truly there is joy for the disciples in meeting the risen Christ.

Under the theme “The Joy of the Resurrection” we find the joy of meeting the risen Christ.

The Gospel lesson selected from the last chapter of Jesus’ life in John’s Gospel tells the story of Jesus’ appearing to His disciples by the Sea of Tiberias. Notice that Jesus sudden appearance on the shore is accepted reality. The disciples did not have to ask who was beckoning them.”They knew it was the LORD.”

The disciples were waiting together. They know that something is soon to happen, but what should they be doing in the meantime? Going fishing is natural and well accepted. We Christians are in a position of waiting; waiting for the LORD to return in glory and to end our worries and trials on earth and to take us to our true home in heaven. But what to do in the meantime?

We can come up with our own ideas to try to fill our lives, and we can convince ourselves that they are good and acceptable ideas. But who successful can they be if the LORD Jesus is not included? How can we keep from letting our selfish nature control our lives and stop or at least hinder our labors in God’s kingdom if Jesus is not present?  We will have just as much success in our spiritual labors as Peter and the others had in fishing.

 But the risen Savior appeared and directs the activity of the disciples. By His almighty power they were given success. The powerful presence did not this time instill fear in Peter, but rather gave him great joy and energy. We need not fear His presence, for He has cleansed us from sin and guilty. He has risen victorious from the grave. His living presence inspires us and equips us for our labors. With Him in our lives we will have a great catch.

Prayer of adoration, praise, and supplication: Almighty and eternal God, we adore You as the God and Father of our Lord and Savior Jesus, and with the whole Church on earth and all the hosts of heaven we ascribe to You honor and blessing, thanksgiving and praise. Holy, holy, holy are You, Lord God Almighty; heaven and earth are full of Your glory. You created us in Your own image and redeemed us with the precious blood of Your Son. By Your Spirit You sanctified us and called us out of darkness into Your marvelous light.[2] – 29 April 2022



[1] Jesus Appears to His Disciples by the Sea, Schnorr Von Carolsfeld woodcuts  copyright © WELS for personal and congregational use

[2] Collect for Adoration and Praise, Lutheran Service Book © 2006 Concordia Publishing House, St. Louis


Wednesday, April 27, 2022

Morning Prayer #127

 


The Coming of the Holy Spirit

Acts 2

 

When the day of Pentecost arrived, they were all together in one place. 2 And suddenly there came from heaven a sound like a mighty rushing wind, and it filled the entire house where they were sitting. 3 And divided tongues as of fire appeared to them and rested [a] on each one of them. 4 And they were all filled with the Holy Spirit and began to speak in other tongues as the Spirit gave them utterance.

 

5 Now there were dwelling in Jerusalem Jews, devout men from every nation under heaven. 6 And at this sound the multitude came together, and they were bewildered, because each one was hearing them speak in his own language. 7 And they were amazed and astonished, saying, “Are not all these who are speaking Galileans? 

 

22 “Men of Israel, hear these words: Jesus of Nazareth, a man attested to you by God with mighty works and wonders and signs that God did through him in your midst, as you yourselves know— 23 this Jesus, [c] delivered up according to the definite plan and foreknowledge of God, you crucified and killed by the hands of lawless men. 24 God raised him up, loosing the pangs of death, because it was not possible for him to be held by it."

 

37 Now when they heard this they were cut to the heart, and said to Peter and the rest of the apostles, “Brothers, what shall we do?” 38 And Peter said to them, “Repent and be baptized every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ for the forgiveness of your sins, and you will receive the gift of the Holy Spirit. 39 For the promise is for you and for your children and for all who are far off, everyone whom the Lord our God calls to himself.” 40 And with many other words he bore witness and continued to exhort them, saying, “Save yourselves from this crooked generation.” 41 So those who received his word were baptized, and there were added that day about three thousand souls.

 

The Fellowship of the Believers

42 And they devoted themselves to the apostles' teaching and the fellowship, to the breaking of bread and the prayers.

 

The Holy Bible, English Standard Version. ESV® Text Edition: 2016. Copyright © 2001 by Crossway Bibles, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers.

 

Schnorr Von Carolsfeld woodcuts © WELS permission granted for personal and congregational use

 


Thursday prior to Easter 3

 


Revelation 5:1–14—As all of our Eastertide first readings come from the book of Acts, so all of our epistle readings come from the book of the Revelation of Jesus Christ to St John. In this portion of John’s vision, he wonders who is worthy to open the scroll containing the counsel of God, His plan of action. Only the Lamb, who was slain, but is alive, is worthy to do so.

In response, those surrounding the throne of God sing a song of high praise to the Lamb. The joy of the resurrection is carried out in the joy of praising the risen Christ in heaven.

Our Epistle lesson for Sunday is from a liturgical section of St. John’s Revelation. Notice the uplifting nature of the words as countless angels sing praise to Christ, the Lamb of God, who is worthy. These angels are then joined by ever creature in existence in praising Christ.

The lesson begins with the host of angels joining in the song of all creatures. This song of praise focuses on Jesus Christ and what He has done. The praise given to the Lamb in this Epistle makes clear that in the midst of troubles the Lamb is in control and that all creatures must eventually acknowledge Him to be Redeemer and Lord. The song of praise climaxes by ascribing might and glory to the LORD alone; all who sing His praise fall down in silent adoration.

Prayer of praise and supplication: Lord God, creator of heaven and earth, Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, we praise You for the abundant mercy that You this day so richly have provided for us, blessing us not only with daily bread for our bodies but also with heavenly food for our souls. Grant that Your living and powerful Word may abide in our hearts, working mightily in us to Your glory and for our salvation. We commit ourselves to Your divine protection and fatherly care. Let Your holy angels be with us that the evil foe may have no power over us. Look in mercy on Your Church and deliver it from all danger and adversities. By Your Holy Spirit comfort and strengthen all who are in affliction or distress, and grant Your abiding peace to us all; through Jesus Christ, our Savior. Amen.[2] -28 April, 2022



[1] Te Deum, copyright © Ed Riojas, Higher Things

[2] Collect of Praise and Supplication, Lutheran Service Book © 2006 Concordia Publishing House


Tuesday, April 26, 2022

Wednesday prior to Easter 3

 

Acts 9:1–22—During Eastertide, the first reading is taken from the book of the Acts of the Apostles, St Luke’s history of the Church during the Apostolic Age. Here, we have the account of the conversion of Saul, a learned Jew who zealously persecuted Christians. But, after being commissioned to be an apostle by the risen Christ, Paul, as he would henceforth be known, became an even more zealous ambassador for the Gospel of Jesus Christ. His encounter gave him the joy of a new life in the risen Lord.

Under the theme, “The Joy of the Resurrection,” we find the joy of a new life in the risen Lord as we hear of the conversion of Paul.

 The man known both as “Paul,” his Roman name; as well as “Saul,” his Hebrew given name,[2] describes in his letter to the Philippians (3:4b-6) that he was taught by Gamaliel. (A prominent Jewish Rabbi)  He describes himself as a genuine, pious and zealous member of Judaism. In fact, from the Pharisaic viewpoint, he was “blameless.”

According Galatians 1:14 he notes that he was ahead of many of his own age in his zealousness for the traditions of his faith. In this zeal he became the leading agent of those seeking to stamp out the blasphemous section of believers in Christ. For Saul there was no other alternative.

According to his letter to the Philippians (3:7-11) Saul notes that as a Pharisee so highly treasured he now is a grateful he is to be considered a servant of Christ. Several times in his letters he expressed his ongoing amazement that God would choose him to be His called missionary to the Mediterranean world. From the time of his conversion to the time of his execution, he faithfully strove day and night to share the Gospel of salvation through faith in Christ as persuasively as possible, but, always without compromise.

Vv. 1-3 sets the tone for the story. Saul received from the high priest letters of extradition to permit him to bring Jewish Christians from Damascus to Jerusalem for trial.  This right was given to the high priest by Julius Caesar in 47 BC with respect to religious matters. As with the trial of Jesus; the Jewish court could find Jesus guilty of death however only the Roman Governor could grant an execution. To which, Pilate declared Jesus innocent, washed his hands of the entire affair and said to the crowd and the religious establishment in particular, “see to it yourselves.”  

From references to the wringing of the Jewish historian Josephus, it is evident that the ancient emporium of Damascus had a large Jewish population. Note also that Luke uses the term, “The Way,” as the official designation of what we now refer to as “the Christians.”  

Collect for the Third Sunday of Easter: O God, through the humiliation of Your Son You raised up the fallen world. Grant to Your faithful people, rescued from the peril of everlasting death, perpetual gladness and eternal joys; through Jesus Christ, our Lord, who lives and reigns with You and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever. Amen [3] – 27 April 2022

[1] The Resurrected Christ, copyright © Ed Riojas, Higher Things

[2] Remember this apostle was Jewish by birth and heritage but also a recognized Roman citizen; in which case he used his citizenship as an opportunity to make his appeal for the gospel to the Emperor in Rome.

[3] Collect for Easter 3, Lutheran Service Book © 2006 Concordia Publishing House, St. Louis,


Monday, April 25, 2022

Morning Prayer #126

 

Acts 1:1-11

The Promise of the Holy Spirit


In the first book, O Theophilus, I have dealt with all that Jesus began to do and teach, 2 until the day when he was taken up, after he had given commands through the Holy Spirit to the apostles whom he had chosen. 3 He presented himself alive to them after his suffering by many proofs, appearing to them during forty days and speaking about the kingdom of God.

 

4 And while staying [a] with them he ordered them not to depart from Jerusalem, but to wait for the promise of the Father, which, he said, “you heard from me; 5 for John baptized with water, but you will be baptized with [b] the Holy Spirit not many days from now.”

 

The Ascension




 

So when they had come together, they asked him, “Lord, will you at this time restore the kingdom to Israel?” 7 He said to them, “It is not for you to know times or seasons that the Father has fixed by his own authority. 8 But you will receive power when the Holy Spirit has come upon you, and you will be my witnesses in Jerusalem and in all Judea and Samaria, and to the end of the earth.” 9 And when he had said these things, as they were looking on, he was lifted up, and a cloud took him out of their sight. 10 And while they were gazing into heaven as he went, behold, two men stood by them in white robes, 11 and said, “Men of Galilee, why do you stand looking into heaven? This Jesus, who was taken up from you into heaven, will come in the same way as you saw him go into heaven.”

 

Footnotes:

Acts 1:4 Or eating

Acts 1:5 Or in

 

English Standard Version (ESV)

The Holy Bible, English Standard Version. ESV® Text Edition: 2016. Copyright © 2001 by Crossway Bibles, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers.

 

Schnorr Von Carolsfeld woodcuts © WELS permission granted for personal and congregational use

Tuesday prior to Easter 3

 

Psalm 30—Sunday’s psalm was composed by David when he dedicated the materials for the building of the Temple (1 Chronicles 22:1–6), and may have been used at subsequent dedications: at the dedication of Solomon’s Temple (2 Chronicles 7:4–10) and in 165 bc at the Jewish Feast of Dedication (Hanukkah; see 1 Maccabees 4:54–59; 2 Maccabees 10:1–9; John 10:22). The psalm is one of thanksgiving to God for preservation of physical life (vv. 1–5) and spiritual life (6–10). Finally, the last two verses give thanks to the Lord for His mercy forever.

Psalm 30 – Remembering a Great God at a Great Event

This psalm has a unique title: A Psalm. A Song at the dedication of the house of David. Though the title of the psalm (as it is in the English translation) indicates it was written for the dedication of David’s palace. Commentators thought that it was actually written prophetically for the dedication of the temple – which David prepared for, but Solomon built. Nevertheless, we take this psalm as being written for the dedication of David’s palace. It says nothing about the house itself; rather the focus is on God and the greatness of His deliverance. At the dedication of David’s house, David wanted God to be praised, not himself.

This Hebrew word schir may be here taken not simply for a song, but for a joyful song, as it is in Genesis 31:27; Exodus 15:1; Psalm 33:3.[2]

Collect for Psalm 30: - God our Father, glorious in giving life and even more glorious in restoring it: In his last night on earth your Son knew anguish and deep sorrow. Do not turn away from us, or we shall fall back into dust: but rather turn our mourning into joy by raising us up with your Son, Christ our Lord.  [3]-26 April, 2022


[1] The Resurrected Christ, copyright © Ed Riojas, Higher Things

[3] Collect for Psalm 30, For All the Saints, A Prayer Book For and By the Church, Vol. I © 1994 The American Lutheran Publicity Bureau, Delhi, NY


Sunday, April 24, 2022

Morning Prayer #125

 

  Matthew 28:16-20

  The Great Commission




Now the eleven disciples went to Galilee, to the mountain to which Jesus had directed them. 17 And when they saw him they worshiped him, but some doubted. 18 And Jesus came and said to them, “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. 19 Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in [b] the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, 20 teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you. And behold, I am with you always, to the end of the age.”

 

Footnotes:

Matthew 28:19 Or into

The Holy Bible, English Standard Version. ESV® Text Edition: 2016. Copyright © 2001 by Crossway Bibles, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers.

 

Go into All the World copyright © Ed Riojas, Higher Things

Monday prior to Easter 3

 

Psalm 145:4–7, 9; antiphon, Psalm 145: 10This Song of Praise by King David leads off the last six psalms, all of them songs of praise. As redeemed children of the Lord, our greatest delight shall always be to give thanks to Him, to bless Him, to commend His mighty works to others, to declare His mighty acts, to meditate on His wondrous works, to speak of the might of His awesome deeds, to declare His greatness, and to sing aloud of His righteousness!

Psalm 145 – Praising God for Who He is and What He Does

This psalm is titled A Praise of David. Though Psalms 17 and 86 were also called A Prayer of David, this is the only one titled A Praise of David, and it is a high point of praise. “Psalm 145 is indeed a monumental praise psalm, a fit summary of all David had learned about God during a long lifetime of following hard after the Almighty.” (James Montgomery Boice)

Psalm 145 is the last psalm attributed to David in the collection of psalms, and it is the last of the nine psalms using some kind of acrostic pattern (9, 10, 25, 34, 37, 111, 112, 119, and 145). Five of these acrostic psalms are attributed to David.

In Jewish practice this psalm was recited twice in the morning and once in the evening service. The Talmud commends all who repeat it three times a day as having a share in the world to come.” (Willem VanGemeren)[2]

Worthy is the Lamb who was slain (Revelation 5:12), who by His cross has conquered sin and death. With His blood, He has ransomed people for God from every tribe and language and people and nations (Revelation 5:9). This same Lord Jesus visits people of all nations and calls them to Himself by the Gospel, even as He revealed Himself again to the disciples…after He was raised from the dead (John 21:1, 14). He restored Simon Peter to faith and life and commissioned him to feed His lambs and tend His sheep (John 21:15–17). Likewise, He revealed Himself to Saul of Tarsus and brought him to repentance, so that the persecutor of Jesus might carry and confess His name before the Gentiles and kings and the children of Israel (Acts 9:15–16).

Collect for Psalm 145: Loving Father, you are faithful in your promises and tender in your compassion. Listen to our hymn of joy, and continue to satisfy the needs of all your creatures, that all flesh may bless your name in your everlasting kingdom, where with your Son and the Holy Spirit you live and reign now and forever.[3] -25 April, 2022



[1] The Resurrected Christ, copyright © Ed Riojas, Higher Things

[3] Collect for Psalm 145, For All the Saints, A Prayer Book For and By the Church, Vol. I © 1994 The American Lutheran Publicity Bureau, Delhi, NY


Easter 3 Series C




Acts 9:1–22
Revelation 5:(1–7) 8–14 
John 21:1–14 (15–19)

O God, through the humiliation of Your Son You raised up the fallen world. Grant to Your faithful people, rescued from the peril of everlasting death, perpetual gladness and eternal joys; through Jesus Christ, our Lord, who lives and reigns with You and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever. 

The Good Shepherd Feeds His Lambs

“Worthy is the Lamb who was slain” (Revelation 5:12), who by His cross has conquered sin and death. With His blood, He has “ransomed people for God from every tribe and language and people and nation” (Revelation 5:9). This same Lord Jesus visits people of all nations and calls them to Himself by the Gospel, even as He “was revealed to the disciples after he was raised from the dead” (John 21:14). He restored Simon Peter to faith and life and commissioned him to feed His lambs and tend His sheep (John 21:15–17). Likewise, He revealed Himself to Saul of Tarsus and brought him to repentance, so that the persecutor of Jesus might carry and confess His name “before the Gentiles and kings and the children of Israel” (Acts 9:15–16).

Look at the extended verses for the Gospel...only time we'll get it...different definitions of "love" between Jesus and Peter...

Jesus Appears to Seven Disciples

John 21:1 –
Μετὰ ταῦτα ἐφανέρωσεν ἑαυτὸν πάλιν ὁ Ἰησοῦς τοῖς μαθηταῖς ἐπὶ τῆς θαλάσσης τῆς Τιβεριάδος• ἐφανέρωσεν δὲ οὕτως.
After this Jesus revealed himself again to the disciples by the Sea of Tiberias, and he revealed himself in this way.

After these things...what things...appearance in upper room? Easter, following Sunday, return to Galilee,  finally after two weeks they are doing what He told them to do returning to Galilee. (Mark  16:7) In Luke Jesus says stay in the city. (Luke 24:49) 

John 21:2 – 
ἦσαν ὁμοῦ Σίμων Πέτρος καὶ Θωμᾶς ὁ λεγόμενος Δίδυμος καὶ Ναθαναὴλ ὁ ἀπὸ Κανὰ τῆς Γαλιλαίας καὶ οἱ τοῦ Ζεβεδαίου καὶ ἄλλοι ἐκ τῶν μαθητῶν αὐτοῦ δύο.
Simon Peter, Thomas (called the Twin), Nathaniel of Cana in Galilee, the sons of Zebedee, and two others of his disciples were together.

Only place where Nathaniel is mentioned as being from “Cana in Galilee.” See John 2 – could this be Jesus’ brother-in-law, brother, some sort of relative? 

John 21:3 – 
λέγει αὐτοῖς Σίμων Πέτρος• Ὑπάγω ἁλιεύειν• λέγουσιν αὐτῷ• Ἐρχόμεθα καὶ ἡμεῖς σὺν σοί. ἐξῆλθον καὶ ἐνέβησαν εἰς τὸ [b]πλοῖον, καὶ ἐν ἐκείνῃ τῇ νυκτὶ ἐπίασαν οὐδέν.
Simon Peter said to them, “I am going fishing.” They said to him, “We will go with you.” They went out and got into the boat, but that night they caught nothing.

I depart to fish the others went with him yet that night they caught not one thing. This is an "Disjunctive kai".  What's up with Peter? He still has equipment to fish. Do you love me more than "these things?"  Fishing without Jesus' word does not work.  Jesus finds Peter through his denial of his vocation. Picking up the nets he's being about what he was not. Peter caught nothing when he was first called. Fished in darkness - a symbol of unbelief? 

John 21:4 – 
Πρωΐας δὲ ἤδη γενομένης ἔστη Ἰησοῦς εἰς τὸν αἰγιαλόν• οὐ μέντοι ᾔδεισαν οἱ μαθηταὶ ὅτι Ἰησοῦς ἐστιν. 
Just as day was breaking, Jesus stood on the shore; yet the disciples did not know that it was Jesus.

As day was breaking, Jesus stood on the shore, never the less the disciples didn't know him. 

John 21:5 – 
λέγει οὖν αὐτοῖς ὁ Ἰησοῦς• Παιδία, μή τι προσφάγιον ἔχετε; ἀπεκρίθησαν αὐτῷ• Οὔ.
Jesus said to them, “Children, do you have any fish?” They answered him, “No.”

"You don't have any fish do you?" expecting a negative response...it's not working...they're fishing without His words "without me you can do nothing"

Jesus calls them Παιδία - "children"

John 21:6 – 
ὁ δὲ εἶπεν αὐτοῖς• Βάλετε εἰς τὰ δεξιὰ μέρη τοῦ πλοίου τὸ δίκτυον, καὶ εὑρήσετε. ἔβαλον οὖν, καὶ οὐκέτι αὐτὸ ἑλκύσαι [f]ἴσχυον ἀπὸ τοῦ πλήθους τῶν ἰχθύων.
 He said to them, “Cast the net on the right side of the boat, and you will find some.” So they cast it, and now they were not able to haul it in, because of the quantity of fish.

Throw the net on the right side of the boat...they were no longer able to draw or drag because of the fullness of fish. (See Luke 5, as cross reference) 

John 21:7 – 
λέγει οὖν ὁ μαθητὴς ἐκεῖνος ὃν ἠγάπα ὁ Ἰησοῦς τῷ Πέτρῳ• Ὁ κύριός ἐστιν. Σίμων οὖν Πέτρος, ἀκούσας ὅτι ὁ κύριός ἐστιν, τὸν ἐπενδύτην διεζώσατο, ἦν γὰρ γυμνός, καὶ ἔβαλεν ἑαυτὸν εἰς τὴν θάλασσαν•
That disciple whom Jesus loved therefore said to Peter, “It is the Lord!” When Simon Peter heard that it was the Lord, he put on his outer garment, for he was stripped for work, and threw himself into the sea.

The disciple whom Jesus loved said it is the Master...why did Peter put on clothes? Compare throw the net and Peter throws himself...Peter goes to Jesus with reckless abandon...the cloak represents his earthly belongings he grabs everything he has...

John 21:8 –
οἱ δὲ ἄλλοι μαθηταὶ τῷ πλοιαρίῳ ἦλθον, οὐ γὰρ ἦσαν μακρὰν ἀπὸ τῆς γῆς ἀλλὰ ὡς ἀπὸ πηχῶν διακοσίων, σύροντες τὸ δίκτυον τῶν ἰχθύων.
The other disciples came in the boat, dragging the net full of fish, for they were not far from the land, but about a hundred yards[a] off.

a. two hundred cubits; a cubit was about 18 inches or about 45 centimeters

John 21:9-
Ὡς οὖν ἀπέβησαν εἰς τὴν γῆν βλέπουσιν ἀνθρακιὰν κειμένην καὶ ὀψάριον ἐπικείμενον καὶ ἄρτον.
When they got out on land, they saw a charcoal fire in place, with fish laid out on it, and bread.

John 21:10
λέγει αὐτοῖς ὁ Ἰησοῦς• Ἐνέγκατε ἀπὸ τῶν ὀψαρίων ὧν ἐπιάσατε νῦν. 
Jesus said to them, “Bring some of the fish that you have just caught.”

John 21:11
ἀνέβη οὖν Σίμων Πέτρος καὶ εἵλκυσεν τὸ δίκτυον εἰς τὴν γῆν μεστὸν ἰχθύων μεγάλων ἑκατὸν πεντήκοντα τριῶν• καὶ τοσούτων ὄντων οὐκ ἐσχίσθη τὸ δίκτυον.
So Simon Peter went aboard and hauled the net ashore, full of large fish, 153 of them. And although there were so many, the net was not torn. 

John 21:12
λέγει αὐτοῖς ὁ Ἰησοῦς• Δεῦτε ἀριστήσατε. οὐδεὶς [i]δὲ ἐτόλμα τῶν μαθητῶν ἐξετάσαι αὐτόν• Σὺ τίς εἶ; εἰδότες ὅτι ὁ κύριός ἐστιν. 
Jesus said to them, “Come and have breakfast.” Now none of the disciples dared ask him, “Who are you?” They knew it was the Lord.

John 21:13
ἔρχεται ὁ Ἰησοῦς καὶ λαμβάνει τὸν ἄρτον καὶ δίδωσιν αὐτοῖς, καὶ τὸ ὀψάριον ὁμοίως.
Jesus came and took the bread and gave it to them, and so with the fish

John 21:14
τοῦτο ἤδη τρίτον ἐφανερώθη ὁ Ἰησοῦς τοῖς μαθηταῖς ἐγερθεὶς ἐκ νεκρῶν.
This was now the third time that Jesus was revealed to the disciples after he was raised from the dead.


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