Friday, July 1, 2022

Saturday prior to Proper 9

 


[1]

Sunday’s Hymn of the Day, Jesus Has Come and Brings Pleasure Eternal(LSB #533), is a majestic hymn of praise to Jesus. It proclaims Jesus as God in the flesh, as our great Deliverer, Redeemer, and the King of all glory.

The author of the hymn is Johann Ludwig Conrad Allendorf, who was born February 9, 1693, in Josbach in the province of Hesse, Germany. His father was a pastor in the small village. Johann went to the University of Giessen in 1711 and two years later studied under Francke, a German Lutheran clergyman and biblical scholar of the time. Johann was a tutor for Count Promnitz’s children at Sorau and was appointed Lutheran Court Preacher at Cothen when the Count’s daughter needed his services to marry a prince. When his services as a reformed preacher were no longer needed, Allendorf moved on to be an assistant in two churches in Wornigerode. In 1755 he became pastor at the Liebfrau Church and remained there until his death in 1773.

Pastor Allendorf wrote 45 hymns, most of which are still used primarily in German-speaking churches. His contributions are described as “hymns of love to Christ, the Lamb of God, and the Bridegroom of the believing Soul.”1 He penned this hymn while pastor at St. Ulrich’s Church in Halle. The words come from the following Bible passages:

Luke 1:68-79: Zechariah’s song in the temple after seeing the Christ child.

1 John 1:1-2: “That which was from the beginning, which we have heard, which we have seen with our eyes, which we have looked at and our hands have touched—this we proclaim concerning the Word of life.”

Isaiah 12: This song of praise and joy ends with the phrase, “Shout aloud and sing for joy, people of Zion, for great is the Holy One of Israel among you.”

 

The tune we use for this hymn is “Cothen” (sometimes spelled Kothen), which appears to have been named for the city where Allendorf first became a minister. This area is in Saxony-Anhalt, in the east central part of Germany. The original copyright for the tune is dated 1773, the year of Allendorf’s death, though it's now well into the public domain.

In America, this hymn is only in two hymnals, including that of the Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod. The hymn was in the Epiphany section of the blue Lutheran Worship hymnal. In the newer Lutheran Service Book, it is placed in the section “Redeemer”, thus encouraging congregations to use it throughout the church year. We will be learning this hymn through the remainder of our Epiphany season. We hope to also utilize it at other times as well, as we anticipate that many of you will be requesting it frequently! “Jesus Has Come and Brings Pleasure Eternal” is a classically beautiful hymn of praise and joy. Our worship will benefit, as will your hearts, from meditation on the words.[2]

Prayer for increase of the holy ministryAlmighty and gracious God, the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, You have commanded us to pray that You would send forth laborers into Your harvest. Of Your infinite mercy give us true teachers and ministers of Your Word who truly fulfill Your command and preach nothing contrary to Your holy Word. Grant that we, being warned, instructed, nurtured, comforted, and strengthened by Your holy Word, may do those things which are well pleasing to You and profitable for our salvation; through Jesus Christ, our Lord. Amen. [3]

Collect for Saturday of the week of Pentecost 4O God in whom we have our being, who in thy light hast revealed thyself unto us, but whom in our darkness we cannot comprehend grant that we may think worthily of thee as we ought to think, and may renew Thine image in us, but the grace of thy Holy Spirit, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen (Anonymous) [4]-02 July, 2022


[1] Lift High the Cross, copyright © Ed Riojas, Higher Things

[3] Collect for an increase of the holy ministry, Lutheran Service Book, © 2006 Concordia Publishing House, St. Louis

[4] Collect for Saturday of the week of Pentecost 4, For All the Saints, A Prayer Book For and By the Church, Vol. II © 1995, The American Lutheran Publicity Bureau, Delhi, NY


Thursday, June 30, 2022

Friday prior to Proper 9

 


Luke 10:1–20Our Lord desires all people to be saved and to come to the knowledge of the truth (1 Timothy 2:4). But how are people to believe in Jesus Christ, if they have not heard of Him, if they have not had the Gospel proclaimed to them? (Romans 10:14) In our Gospel reading for Sunday, we hear how Jesus sent out 72 men to proclaim the Good News of salvation in Christ Jesus. Likewise, He still calls pastors to labor in His harvest fields. As in the days of Christ, their labor is met by different responses: some people are eager to hear of the forgiveness of sins wrought by Christ’s death on the cross, whilst others reject it. The Day of Judgment will be a horrifying one for those who have refused the forgiveness Christ offers, but a glorious one for us who are in Christ, who gratefully receive His gift of salvation.

After this” (V.1) refers to the incidents in the preceding chapter. “The Lord appointed seventy others,” in addition to the twelve disciples who had already been sent on a similar mission. (Luke 9:1-2)  I send you out as lambs in the midst of wolves,” (v. 3) is a picture of the risks Christian preachers take, for they are seemingly weak and defenseless. Yet they are not to worry about their livelihood but are to work with a joyous abandon (v.4a) nor are they to dally in aimless conversation with individuals they meet. (V.4b)

Peace be to this house!” (Friedheim!) is more than a common salutation. It is an offer of divine peace, as is evident from V. 6 which describes the peace spoken of as resting on a son of peace.  “And remain in that some house,” (v.7) indicated that one house and family were to be selected as the center of the work.

The missionaries were also to eat whatever was set before them without fussing about clean or unclean foods. (Vv.7-8) To attest that they had been sent by the LORD with an offer of divine peace, they also headed the sick. (V.9)  God saw that this miraculous power was needed in the early days of the church. Those appointed hardly believe that they had such power, even after Christ had announced the gift to them. (V.17)  The reception of their message reflects the attitude of the hearers toward Christ Himself. (V.16)

A prayer for pastors and their peopleAlmighty God, by Your Son, our Savior, You have always given to Your Church on earth faithful shepherds to guide and feed Your flock. Therefore we pray, make all pastors diligent to preach Your holy Word and to administer Your means of grace, and grant Your people wisdom to follow in the way that leads to life eternal; through Jesus Christ, Your Son, our Lord, who lives and reigns with You and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever. [2]  Amen.

Prayer for Friday of the week of Pentecost 4:  Deliver us, O God, from our little fears, and spoil for us whatever confidence we have left in anything but Thy victory. [3] 01 July, 2022



[1] Lift High the Cross, copyright © Ed Riojas, Higher Things

[2] Lutheran Service Book © 2006 Concordia Publishing House, St. Louis

[3] Prayer for Friday of the week of Pentecost 4, For All the Saints, A Prayer Book For and By the Church, Vol. II © 1995 The American P=Lutheran Publicity bureau, Delhi, NY


Wednesday, June 29, 2022

Thursday prior to Proper 9

 

Galatians 6:1–10, 14–18—This Sunday, we shall celebrate our nation’s independence. Our political liberty and freedom is a gift from God. Yet, in the Church, we are not independent. We are member of one body, the mystical body of Christ (1 Corinthians 12:27). As such, we are not to live our lives for ourselves independent of others, but are to bear one another’s burdens. The strong Christians are to help the weak.

St Paul urges us, let us not grow weary of doing good, for we are a new creation in Christ, and, as such, our wills are conformed to God’s will, which desires what is best for all people.

Under the theme “The Nature of God’s Kingdom” the epistle lessons tells of life in the Kingdom on earth.

This lesson speaks especially about good works; to bear one another’s burden, to “forgive those who trespass against us,” to share all good things with him who teaches us. But the apostle Paul does not forget to make it clear that these good works come only from a “new creation” from those who are able to “sow to the Spirit.”

Te natural human impulse is to act, to judge one’s actions, and to approve or correct oneself. (The conscience)  For this reason it is so difficult for us to understand the impossible for us to believe that God forgives without our being able to correct our mistakes and to justify ourselves before God.  God has to change our minds and make us accept forgiveness by faith in Christ. (See 1 Corinthians 2:6-16)

Collect for the Pentecost SeasonAlmighty God, You have built Your Church on the foundation of the apostles and prophets with Christ Jesus Himself as the cornerstone. Continue to send Your messengers to preserve Your people in true peace that, by the preaching of Your Word, Your Church may be kept free from all harm and danger; through Jesus Christ, Your Son, our Lord, who lives and reigns with You and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever. Amen.[2]

Collect for Thursday of the week of Pentecost 4:  O thou who in almighty power wast weak and in perfect Excellency was lowly, grant unto us the same mind. All that we have which is our own is naught if we have any good in us it is wholly thy gift.  O Savior, since thou, the Lord of heaven and earth didst humble thyself, grant unto us true humility, and make us like thyself, and then, of thine infinite goodness, raise us to thine everlasting  glory; who livest and reignest with the Father and the Holy Ghost, forever and ever. Amen (Thomas Crammer) -[3]30 June, 2022



[1] Lift High the Cross, copyright © Ed Riojas, Higher Things

[2] Lutheran Service Book © 2006 Concordia Publishing House. St. Louis

[3] Collect for Thursday of the week of Pentecost 4, For All the Saints, A Prayer Book For and By the Church, Vol. II © 1995 The American Lutheran Publicity Bureau, Delhi, NY


Tuesday, June 28, 2022

Wednesday prior to Proper 9

 


Isaiah 66:10–14Those who remained faithful to the Lord during the days when Isaiah prophesied in Judah had reason to mourn over Jerusalem: hypocrisy, unbelief, and idolatry were common among the people. Likewise, through the ages, including our own, God’s faithful people have reason to mourn when they see the condition of the visible Church: rejection of the authority of the Word of God, acceptance of sins, rather than forgiveness of sins, being preached, and so on. Yet, we know that the gates of hell shall not prevail against the Lord’s Church (Matthew 16:18), so we can rejoice. We can rejoice, for the pure Gospel of Jesus Christ provides nourishment, comfort, and abundance for our souls. As a mother nurses her child, so we are nursed by the Holy Word of God.

Under the theme “The Nature of God’s Kingdom” Isaiah tells us of life in the New Jerusalem. There is reason to rejoice for God blesses her with prosperity and comfort.

The birth of a baby is a miracle, a wonder to behold. Thus, Isaiah begins this oracle with the exhortation to rejoice in Jerusalem. Don’t mourn for her! She is not dead! Her inhabitants have been carted off into long captivity in Babylon and it would seem that there is no life in her; yet she is very much alive. The LORD will cause her to bring forth sons who will rejoice in her.

Isaiah’s prophecy breaks into our gloom and doom with a startling announcement; Like Jerusalem of old, the LORD’s church is very much alive! Despite appearances, it is not yet time to mourn over her. The LORD has begotten a Son twice; once in eternity and once in time, as He sent His only begotten Son into the world that whoever believes in Him may have eternal life. And this Son has “given birth” to His Church. It is His church, it is His body. He has brought it into existence through His life, death and resurrection and He will maintain it and make it prosper. 

Collect for Proper 9: Almighty God, You have built Your Church on the foundation of the apostles and prophets with Christ Jesus Himself as the cornerstone. Continue to send Your messengers to preserve Your people in true peace that, by the preaching of Your Word, Your Church may be kept free from hard and danger; through Jesus Christ, Your Son, our Lord, who lives and reigns with You and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever.[2] Amen

Collect for Wednesday of the week of Pentecost 4: Almighty and everlasting God, give us an increase of faith, hope and love; and that we may obtain what you have promised, make us love what you have commanded; through Jesus Christ, your Son, our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever. Amen [3] -29 June, 2022


[1] Lift High the Cross, copyright © Ed Riojas, Higher Things

[2] Collect for Proper 9, Lutheran Service Book © 2006 Concordia Publishing House, St. Louis

[3] Collect for Wednesday of the week of Pentecost 4, For All the Saints, A Prayer Book For and By the Church, Vol. II © 1995 The American Lutheran Publicity Bureau, Delhi, NY


Monday, June 27, 2022

Tuesday prior to Proper 9

 

Psalm 66:1–7Psalm 66 calls upon all peoples of the earth to join in with God’s chosen people, Israel, in praising Him. His deliverance of His people from bondage in Egypt and the threat of Pharaoh and his army at the Red Sea is specifically recounted, but all of God’s deliverances of all His people are to be included, especially the deliverance of mankind from the bondage of sin, and the threat of death.

Psalm 66 – How everyone can praise God

This psalm is titled To the Chief Musician. A Song. A Psalm. As with Psalm 65, it is described as both a Song and a Psalm. This is the first psalm since Psalm 50 to not be attributed to David.

This Psalm is said to be recited on Easter day, by the Greek Church: it is described in the Greek Bible as A Psalm of the Resurrection, and may be understood to refer, in a prophetic sense, to the regeneration of the world, through the conversion of the Gentiles.[2]

Collect for Psalm 66: Almighty Father, you brought us through the waters of baptism to the shores of new life, accept the sacrifice of our lives, and let us enter your house, there to praise your unfailing power and love, through your Son, Jesus Christ our Lord. [3]   Amen

Collect for Tuesday of the week of Pentecost 4O God, from whom all good proceeds: Grant that by your inspiration we may think those things that are right, and by your merciful guiding may do them; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, forever and ever. Amen [4]- 28 June, 2022


[1] Lift High the Cross, copyright © Ed Riojas, Higher Things

[3] Collect for Psalm 66, For All the Saints, A Prayer Book For and By the Church, Vol. II © 1995 The American Lutheran Publicity Bureau, Delhi, NY

[4] ibid


Sunday, June 26, 2022

Monday prior to Proper 9

 

Psalm 19:2, 4–6; antiphon, Psalm 19:1—Many of the psalms praise the Lord for His deliverance from enemies, both mortal and spiritual. Psalm 19 is a hymn of praise to God because of the majesty and glory that are His by His very nature. The glory of God is revealed by the entire creation. Those who attribute the earth and the cosmos to mere happenstance are only deceiving themselves.

Psalm 19 – The heavens, the word, and the glory of God

The title tells us both the author and the audience of the psalm: To the Chief Musician. A Psalm of David. Some believe that the Chief Musician is the Lord GOD Himself, and others suppose him to be a leader of choirs or musicians in David’s time, such as Heman the singer or Asaph (1 Chronicles 6:33, 16:5-7, and 25:6).

This Psalm reflects, more than any other, the beauty and splendor of the Hebrew poetry found in the Psalter. C.S. Lewis wrote, ‘I take this to be the greatest poem in the Psalter and one of the greatest lyrics in the world.’[2]

The Lord restores Jerusalem, His Church, because she is the mother of His children, whom He comforts “as one whom his mother comforts” (Isaiah 66:13). We are “satisfied from her consoling breast” with the pure milk of the Word, and we “drink deeply with delight from her glorious abundance” (Isaiah 66:11). The messengers of Christ bestow such gifts upon His Church. For He sends them out “as lambs in the midst of wolves” (Luke 10:3), bearing in their bodies the sacrifice of His cross, by which “the kingdom of God has come near” (Luke 10:9, 11). Wherever He enters in with this Gospel, Satan is cast out and falls “like lightning from heaven” (Luke 10:18). Thus, we do not “boast except in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ” (Galatians 6:14). Rejoicing in this Gospel, we “bear one another’s burdens” in love, according to “the law of Christ” (Galatians 6:2). [3]

Collect for Psalm 19: Heavenly Father, you have filled the world with beauty., Open our eyes to see your gracious hand in all your works, that rejoicing in your whole creation, we may learn to serve you with gladness, for the sake of him through whom all things were made, your Son, Jesus Christ our Lord. [4]

Collect for Monday of the week of Pentecost 4: God of the universe, we worship you as Lord, God, ever close to us; we rejoice to call you Father. From this world’s uncertainty we look to your covenant. Keep us one in your peace, secure in your love. We ask this through Christ our Lord. Amen [5]-27 June, 2022


[1] Lift High the Cross, copyright © Ed Riojas, Higher Things

[3] Lectionary summary, LCMS commission on worship

[4] Collect for Psalm 19, For All the Saints, A Prayer Book For and By the Church, Vol. II © 1995 The American Lutheran Publicity Bureau, Delhi, NY

[5] Ibid


Proper 9 Series C (July 3 -9)



Proper 9 Series C
(July 3-9)

Isaiah 66:10–14
Galatians 6:1–10, 14–18
Luke 10:1–20

The Lord Grants Peace and Life to His Church

The Lord restores Jerusalem, His Church, because she is the mother of His children, whom He comforts “as one whom his mother comforts” (Is. 66:13). We are “satisfied from her consoling breast” with the pure milk of the Word, and we “drink deeply with delight from her glorious abundance” (Isaiah 66:11). The messengers of Christ bestow such gifts upon His Church. For He sends them out “as lambs in the midst of wolves” (Luke 10:3), bearing in their bodies the sacrifice of His cross, by which “the kingdom of God has come near” (Luke 10:9, 11). Wherever He enters in with this Gospel, Satan is cast out and falls “like lightning from heaven” (Luke 10:18). Thus, we do not “boast except in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ” (Galatians 6:14). Rejoicing in this Gospel, we “bear one another’s burdens” in love, according to “the law of Christ” (Galatians 6:2).


Almighty God, You have built Your church on the foundation of the apostles and prophets with Christ Jesus Himself as the cornerstone. Continue to send Your messengers to preserve Your people in true peace that, by the preaching of Your Word, Your Church may be kept free from harm and danger; through Jesus Christ Your Son, our Lord, who lives and reigns with You and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever.

How is Jesus trying to get us to see the world as He does?
How is His view different from other viewpoints that hold our attention?
How might this text influence the way we live our lives and live out our faith?

Jesus Sends Out the Seventy-Two
Luke 10:1-20

Luke 10:1
Μετὰ δὲ ταῦτα ἀνέδειξεν ὁ κύριος ]καὶ ἑτέρους ἑβδομήκοντα δύο καὶ ἀπέστειλεν αὐτοὺς ἀνὰ δύο δύο πρὸ προσώπου αὐτοῦ εἰς πᾶσαν πόλιν καὶ τόπον οὗ ἤμελλεν αὐτὸς ἔρχεσθαι. 



 After this the Lord appointed seventy-two others and sent them on ahead of him, two by two, into every town and place where he himself was about to go

 :1 - the 72 "others" links to the LXX text of Genesis 10 (nations descended from Noah) and the number of nations in Jewish thought. Christ's kingdom goes beyond the narrow boundaries of the Jewish nation extending to all the nations of the world. This mission has eschatological implications - the last days of OT prophecy have broken into the present evil age.

Luke 10:2
 ἔλεγεν δὲ πρὸς αὐτούς· Ὁ μὲν θερισμὸς πολύς, οἱ δὲ ἐργάται ὀλίγοι· δεήθητε οὖν τοῦ κυρίου τοῦ θερισμοῦ ὅπως ἐργάτας ἐκβάλῃ εἰς τὸν θερισμὸν αὐτοῦ.
And he said to them, “The harvest is plentiful, but the laborers are few. Therefore pray earnestly to the Lord of the harvest to send out laborers into his harvest.

:2 - a metaphor - of the harvest is usually used in Scripture for judgment - Jer. 51:33; Hos. 6:11; JL. 3:13; Rev.14:15  - here it is positive see Isa. 9:3, Ps.  126:5-6. The metaphor "mission is a harvest" still guides the church's thinking about missions today. See the petition, "Thy kingdom come." 

Luke 10:3
ὑπάγετε· ἰδοὺ ἀποστέλλω ὑμᾶς ὡς ἄρνας ἐν μέσῳ λύκων.

Go your way; behold, I am sending you out as lambs in the midst of wolves.


:3 - a comparison - The metaphor of GOD's people as lambs and YHWH as shepherd is common in the OT - Isa. 40:11; Ez34:11-31; Ps. 23:1; 79:13; 95:7 -  Isa.53:7 the servant of YHWH is "like a lamb led to slaughter."  This guides the church's thinking about our identity, what we are to expect from the world, what our relationship  to Jesus means.

Luke 10:4
 μὴ βαστάζετε βαλλάντιον, μὴ πήραν, μὴ ὑποδήματα, καὶ μηδένα κατὰ τὴν ὁδὸν ἀσπάσησθε.
Carry no moneybag, no knapsack, no sandals, and greet no one on the road.

:4 - instructions - do not always...in Africa the greeting lasts a long time...literally "how is your day?"  They are not to be begging on the street.

:5-13 - regulations and brief developments of themes -

Luke 10:5

εἰς ἣν δ’ ἂν εἰσέλθητε οἰκίαν πρῶτον λέγετε· Εἰρήνη τῷ οἴκῳ τούτῳ.
Whatever house you enter, first say, ‘Peace be to this house!’

:5 - Whichever house you enter say, "Friedheim"

Luke 10:6

καὶ ἐὰν ᾖ ἐκεῖ υἱὸς εἰρήνης, ἐπαναπαήσεται ἐπ’ αὐτὸν ἡ εἰρήνη ὑμῶν· εἰ δὲ μήγε, ἐφ’ ὑμᾶς ἀνακάμψει.

And if a son of peace is there, your peace will rest upon him. But if not, it will return to you.


:6 - the son of peace will not be destroyed in the face of rejection. You will not loose the peace which is yours.


Luke 10:7    

 ἐν αὐτῇ δὲ τῇ οἰκίᾳ μένετε, ἐσθίοντες καὶ πίνοντες τὰ παρ’ αὐτῶν, ἄξιος γὰρ ὁ ἐργάτης τοῦ μισθοῦ αὐτοῦ. μὴ μεταβαίνετε ἐξ οἰκίας εἰς οἰκίαν.
And remain in the same house, eating and drinking what they provide, for the laborer deserves his wages. Do not go from house to house.

:7 -  in that house remain, eating and drinking what they provide. The worker is worthy. Do not move from house to house.

Luke 10:8

καὶ εἰς ἣν ἂν πόλιν εἰσέρχησθε καὶ δέχωνται ὑμᾶς, ἐσθίετε τὰ παρατιθέμενα ὑμῖν,
Whenever you enter a town and they receive you, eat what is set before you.

:8 - and any city you enter eat what is set before you.  The rewards do come.

Luke 10:9

 καὶ θεραπεύετε τοὺς ἐν αὐτῇ ἀσθενεῖς, καὶ λέγετε αὐτοῖς· Ἤγγικεν ἐφ’ ὑμᾶς ἡ βασιλεία τοῦ θεοῦ.
Heal the sick in it and say to them, ‘The kingdom of God has come near to you.’

:9 - 72 heal the sick and proclaim the kingdom near - a foretaste of the salvation God Has promised. The kingdom is still near, but seems invisible now. We are still waiting for Jesus to appear again and tie up what appears to be a loose end. 

Luke 10:10

εἰς ἣν δ’ ἂν πόλιν εἰσέλθητε καὶ μὴ δέχωνται ὑμᾶς, ἐξελθόντες εἰς τὰς πλατείας αὐτῆς εἴπατε·
But whenever you enter a town and they do not receive you, go into its streets and say,

Luke 10:11

Καὶ τὸν κονιορτὸν τὸν κολληθέντα ἡμῖν ἐκ τῆς πόλεως ὑμῶν [l]εἰς τοὺς πόδας ἀπομασσόμεθα ὑμῖν· πλὴν τοῦτο γινώσκετε ὅτιἤγγικεν ἡ βασιλεία τοῦ θεοῦ.

‘Even the dust of your town that clings to our feet we wipe off against you. Nevertheless know this, that the kingdom of God has come near.’


:10-11 -  whatever city you enter and they do not welcome you go into the streets and say, "even the dust that's clinger to our feet we wipe off, except know this the kingdom of God has come here."

Luke 10:12

λέγω ὑμῖν ὅτι Σοδόμοις ἐν τῇ ἡμέρᾳ ἐκείνῃ ἀνεκτότερον ἔσται ἢ τῇ πόλει ἐκείνῃ.
I tell you, it will be more bearable on that day for Sodom than for that town.
            - Sodom, see judgment (Gen.19)

Woe to Unrepentant Cities

Luke 10:13

Οὐαί σοι, Χοραζίν· οὐαί σοι, Βηθσαϊδά· ὅτι εἰ ἐν Τύρῳ καὶ Σιδῶνι ἐγενήθησαν αἱ δυνάμεις αἱ γενόμεναι ἐν ὑμῖν, πάλαι ἂν ἐν σάκκῳ καὶ σποδῷ καθήμενοι μετενόησαν.
“Woe to you, Chorazin! Woe to you, Bethsaida! For if the mighty works done in you had been done in Tyre and Sidon, they would have repented long ago, sitting in sackcloth and ashes.

:14-15 - lamentation -


Luke 10:14

πλὴν Τύρῳ καὶ Σιδῶνι ἀνεκτότερον ἔσται ἐν τῇ κρίσει ἢ ὑμῖν
But it will be more bearable in the judgment for Tyre and Sidon than for you.
            
- Tyre/Sidon known for idolatry and resistance to YHWH .

Luke 10:15

καὶ σύ, Καφαρναούμ,  μὴ ἕως οὐρανοῦ ὑψωθήσῃ; ἕως τοῦ ᾅδου καταβιβασθήσῃ.
And you, Capernaum, will you be exalted to heaven? You shall be brought down to Hades.

:15 Capernaum see language uttered against Babylon in Isa.14:12-15. Yet the judgment spoken by Jesus is a future yet to come. Jesus uses eschatological language of judgment that waits fulfillment.

Luke 10:16

Ὁ ἀκούων ὑμῶν ἐμοῦ ἀκούει, καὶ ὁ ἀθετῶν ὑμᾶς ἐμὲ ἀθετεῖ· ὁ δὲ ἐμὲ ἀθετῶν ἀθετεῖ τὸν ἀποστείλαντά με.
“The one who hears you hears me, and the one who rejects you rejects me, and the one who rejects me rejects him who sent me.”

:16 - a wisdom saying -


The Return of the Seventy-Two
Luke 10:17

Ὑπέστρεψαν δὲ οἱ ἑβδομήκοντα δύο μετὰ χαρᾶς λέγοντες· Κύριε, καὶ τὰ δαιμόνια ὑποτάσσεται ἡμῖν ἐν τῷ ὀνόματί σου. 
The seventy-two returned with joy, saying, “Lord, even the demons are subject to us in your name!”    

:17 - an apocalyptic tone - the 72 rejoice in their success expressed in terms of healing and exorcism not conversion . Satan still exerts his power in this age. Satan has fallen, yet he prowls like a lion. Both are true, a tension that awaits resolution.

Luke 10:18

εἶπεν δὲ αὐτοῖς· Ἐθεώρουν τὸν Σατανᾶν ὡς ἀστραπὴν ἐκ τοῦ οὐρανοῦ πεσόντα.

And he said to them, “I saw Satan fall like lightning from heaven.


Luke 10:19

ἰδοὺ δέδωκα ὑμῖν τὴν ἐξουσίαν τοῦ πατεῖν ἐπάνω ὄφεων καὶ σκορπίων, καὶ ἐπὶ πᾶσαν τὴν δύναμιν τοῦ ἐχθροῦ, καὶ οὐδὲν ὑμᾶς οὐ μὴ [u]ἀδικήσῃ.
Behold, I have given you authority to tread on serpents and scorpions, and over all the power of the enemy, and nothing shall hurt you.

:19 - a juridical tone -

Luke 10:20

πλὴν ἐν τούτῳ μὴ χαίρετε ὅτι τὰ πνεύματα ὑμῖν ὑποτάσσεται, χαίρετε δὲ ὅτι τὰ ὀνόματα ὑμῶν ἐγγέγραπται ἐν τοῖς οὐρανοῖς.
Nevertheless, do not rejoice in this, that the spirits are subject to you, but rejoice that your names are written in heaven.”

:20 - an opportunity to talk about the significance of baptism for the certainty of salvation. Our names are written gives assurance that God will not forget about us. The words we hear in absolution and communion God Is speaking to each of us "Your name is written in heaven. Rejoice!

ESV® Text Edition: 2016. Copyright © 2001 by Crossway Bibles, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers.

The Greek New Testament: SBL Edition. Copyright © 2010 by Society of Biblical Literature and Logos Bible Software