Sunday, July 3, 2022

Proper 10 Series C (July 10-16)


Proper 10 - Series C 
(July 10, 2022) 

Leviticus (18:1–5) 19:9–18
Colossians 1:1–14
Luke 10:25–37

Jesus Is Our Good Samaritan

Lord Jesus Christ, in Your deep compassion You rescue us from whatever may hurt us. Teach us to love You above all things and to love our neighbors as ourselves; for You live and reign with the Father and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever.

The Law commands that “you shall love the Lord your God” with all your heart, soul, mind and strength (Luke 10:27), and that you shall “love your neighbor as yourself” (Leviticus 19:18). Love fulfills the Law because love does no harm to the neighbor. Christ Jesus is the Good Samaritan, who with divine compassion saves you from all evil. He takes your sin and death upon Himself and bears these in His body to the cross. He binds up your wounds with the healing balm of His Gospel, and He brings you into His Church, where He takes care of you at His own expense (Luke 10:34–35). By such mercy, He proves “to be a neighbor to the man who fell among the robbers” (Luke 10:36). Therefore, “you go, and do likewise” (Luke 10:37). By “your faith in Christ Jesus” and “because of the hope laid up for you in heaven” (Colossians 1:4–5), you have the same love for others as the Lord Jesus has for you.

The popular phrase "Be a Good Samaritan" is meant to motivate you to help someone you don't want to. It sounds clever, but spiritually speaking, it is a burden. Most times you help the person you don't want to, their lack of appreciation and demand for more can be defeating and exhausting. It can leave you feeling you were right, that you shouldn't have. More than exhausting, it leads many to give up. So it is with any motivation from the Law: it reveals our sin.

Jesus, though, did not come teaching lessons like the Good Samaritan to inspire you how to live a good life but to reveal that we can't. But once you realize that, your Savior then desires to show your repentant heart what He has done to free you and forgive you.

Jesus truly helped all, only He was the "Good Samaritan" we should be. As the Son of God, He was the only One who could be. His greatest act of love proves it to be the case. Jesus offered His life in exchange for yours, took all your sins away as His own, and paid their full price on His cross. In exchange, He gives you everything, the forgiveness of sins and eternal life.
- Pr. Tim Daub 

In telling the parable of The Good Samaritan Jesus appears to have made a tactical blunder.  Speaking to Jews, and particularly to a Jewish “lawyer”—who by definition was an authority on Jewish law—Jesus makes the merciful hero of his parable a Samaritan.  The “good guy” in the parable is neither the noble Jewish priest nor the official temple working Levite; the “good guy” is the despised Samaritan!

Though the Samaritans in Jesus’ day appeared to live as Jews in an area of the former “northern kingdom” of Israel—the area between the Jewish regions of Judea and Galilee—yet no Jew considered a Samaritan to be at all Jewish.  In fact there was a deep rift between Jews and Samaritans—and we are not speaking of a geographic rift.  Because of this rift the Samaritans had established their own temple on Mt. Gerazim while the Jews worshiped at God’s Temple in Jerusalem.

The rift began in Old Testament times when God sent judgment upon the hypocritical Jews and allowed their temple—His Temple—to be destroyed and most of the Jews deported to Babylon.  After 70 years of captivity in Babylon the now-repentant Jews returned to Jerusalem to rebuild God’s Temple.  Jews who had not been deported and remained behind in the region of Samaria had intermarried with pagans, thus diluting, compromising or even destroying Jewish beliefs.  When the Jews returned to rebuild God’s Temple, the Samaritans asked to join them in the task.  When the Jews refused their proposed assistance, the Samaritans actually petitioned the king of Assyria to have the building of God’s Temple halted (Ezra 4)!  For over 400 years there was such bad blood between Jews and Samaritans that for a Jew to call someone a “Samaritan” was tantamount to cursing him.

When Jesus encountered the Samaritan woman at the well, the Apostle John interjected the explanation, “Jews have no dealings with Samaritans.” (Jn. 4:9b).  And when the truth spoken by Jesus rubbed the Jewish leaders the wrong way they cursed Him by saying, “Are we not right in saying that you are a Samaritan and have a demon?” (Jn. 8:48).  Interestingly Jesus would deny having a demon but he would not deny the appellation of Samaritan.

Though fully Jewish, fully obeying all of God’s laws, yet Jesus is the Samaritan.   He would take the position of the hated and cursed man. He would thus be despised and rejected of men, the man of sorrows who journeys to the cross for mankind’s salvation.  The crucified Jesus—who thus associated with the broken, forsaken and dying people of this world—now reaches out to just such people. Jesus, not the Jewish priest or Levite, would be the one to show mercy to beaten, robbed and left-for-dead humanity.  Only Jesus could apply the sin-healing balm of His Word, including the oil of Baptism and the wine of the Lord’s Supper.  Only Jesus would carry His enemy to the “inn” of the church, and there He would provide for continued sustenance and healing.  Only Jesus is truly the Good Samaritan.

After Jesus had accomplished mankind’s salvation the Gospel would spread from Jerusalem to Samaria, and the forensically justified people of God would come to realize that the gospel of Jesus heals the rift between Jew and Samaritan—and in fact all feuds and racial rifts are healed as people are united in the crucified and risen “Samaritan”.   He showed mercy and now in Him we do likewise, finding in the downtrodden Jesus Himself.
- Pr. Daniel J Brege


The Parable of the Good Samaritan
Luke 10:25-37

:25 Καὶ ἰδοὺ νομικός τις ἀνέστη ἐκπειράζων αὐτὸν λέγων• Διδάσκαλε, τί ποιήσας ζωὴν αἰώνιον κληρονομήσω;
 And behold, a lawyer stood up to put him to the test, saying, “Teacher, what shall I do to inherit eternal life?” 

26 ὁ δὲ εἶπεν πρὸς αὐτόν• Ἐν τῷ νόμῳ τί γέγραπται; πῶς ἀναγινώσκεις;
 He said to him, “What is written in the Law? How do you read it?” 

27 ὁ δὲ ἀποκριθεὶς εἶπεν• Ἀγαπήσεις κύριον τὸν θεόν σου ἐξ ὅλης]τῆς καρδίας σου καὶ ἐν ὅλῃ τῇ ψυχῇ σου καὶ ἐν ὅλῃ τῇ ἰσχύϊ σου καὶ ἐν ὅλῃ τῇ διανοίᾳ σου, καὶ τὸν πλησίον σου ὡς σεαυτόν.
 And he answered, “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your strength and with all your mind, and your neighbor as yourself.”

28 εἶπεν δὲ αὐτῷ• Ὀρθῶς ἀπεκρίθης• τοῦτο ποίει καὶ ζήσῃ.
And he said to him, “You have answered correctly; do this, and you will live.”

The righteous requirements of the Law still remain a mandate. Jesus did not come to abolish the law but to fulfill it.  See Matthew 5:17-20 Jesus is not an antinomian. “Do this and you will live.” 

29 Ὁ δὲ θέλων δικαιῶσαι ἑαυτὸν εἶπεν πρὸς τὸν Ἰησοῦν• Καὶ τίς ἐστίν μου πλησίον;
But he, desiring to justify himself, said to Jesus, “And who is my neighbor?”

θέλων δικαιῶσαι ἑαυτὸν The path into hell is always paved with good intentions. The Old Adam in us is still trying self-justification. 

30 ὑπολαβὼν]δὲ ὁ Ἰησοῦς εἶπεν• Ἄνθρωπός τις κατέβαινεν ἀπὸ Ἰερουσαλὴμ εἰς Ἰεριχὼ καὶ λῃσταῖς περιέπεσεν, οἳ καὶ ἐκδύσαντες αὐτὸν καὶ πληγὰς ἐπιθέντες ἀπῆλθον ἀφέντες ἡμιθανῆ.
Jesus replied, “A man was going down from Jerusalem to Jericho, and he fell among robbers, who stripped him and beat him and departed, leaving him half dead.

31 κατὰ συγκυρίαν δὲ ἱερεύς τις κατέβαινεν ἐν τῇ ὁδῷ ἐκείνῃ, καὶ ἰδὼν αὐτὸν ἀντιπαρῆλθεν
 Now by chance a priest was going down that road, and when he saw him he passed by on the other side.

32 ὁμοίως δὲ καὶ Λευίτης κατὰ τὸν τόπον ἐλθὼν καὶ ἰδὼν ἀντιπαρῆλθεν
So likewise a Levite, when he came to the place and saw him, passed by on the other side. . 

33 Σαμαρίτης δέ τις ὁδεύων ἦλθεν κατ’ αὐτὸν καὶ ἰδὼν ἐσπλαγχνίσθη,
But a Samaritan, as he journeyed, came to where he was, and when he saw him, he had compassion.

ἐσπλαγχνίσθη - from the ”inward parts” or “guts.”  The verb suggests being moved from the innermost core of one’s being.  A gut-wrenching stomach churning form of mercy.  This is Jesus, who sees sheep without a shepherd  Matthew 9:36; who cares for the sick - Mark 14:14; and the widow -  Luke 7:14.

In the parables Jesus is the forgiving king -  Matthew 18:27, the father of the prodigal -  Luke 15:20; the Samaritan :33. He’s moved in his very bowels with compassion, the giver of gut-wrenching compassion.

34 καὶ προσελθὼν κατέδησεν τὰ τραύματα αὐτοῦ ἐπιχέων ἔλαιον καὶ οἶνον, ἐπιβιβάσας δὲ αὐτὸν ἐπὶ τὸ ἴδιον κτῆνος ἤγαγεν αὐτὸν εἰς πανδοχεῖον καὶ ἐπεμελήθη αὐτοῦ.
He went to him and bound up his wounds, pouring on oil and wine. Then he set him on his own animal and brought him to an inn and took care of him.

35 καὶ ἐπὶ τὴν αὔριον ἐκβαλὼν [l]δύο δηνάρια ἔδωκεν τῷ πανδοχεῖ καὶ εἶπεν• Ἐπιμελήθητι αὐτοῦ, καὶ ὅ τι ἂν προσδαπανήσῃς ἐγὼ ἐν τῷ ἐπανέρχεσθαί με ἀποδώσω σοι
And the next day he took out two denarii[a] and gave them to the innkeeper, saying, ‘Take care of him, and whatever more you spend, I will repay you when I come back.’

A denarius was a day's wage for a laborer

36 τίς τούτων τῶν τριῶν πλησίον δοκεῖ σοι γεγονέναι τοῦ ἐμπεσόντος εἰς τοὺς λῃστάς
 Which of these three, do you think, proved to be a neighbor to the man who fell among the robbers?” 

37 ὁ δὲ εἶπεν• Ὁ ποιήσας τὸ ἔλεος μετ’ αὐτοῦ. εἶπεν δὲ αὐτῷ ὁ Ἰησοῦς• Πορεύου καὶ σὺ ποίει ὁμοίως.
He said, “The one who showed him mercy.” And Jesus said to him, “You go, and do likewise.”

The Christian life is not mere theory. It is faith always active in love toward the neighbor. God does not need your good works. Your neighbor, however always will. 

Footnotes:
LCMS Lectionary notes and summaries © 2019
Collect for Proper 10 Lutheran Service Book © 20006 Concordia Publishing House, St. Louis
The Greek New Testament: SBL Edition. Copyright © 2010 by Society of Biblical Literature and Logos Bible Software
ESV® Text Edition: 2016. Copyright © 2001 by Crossway Bibles, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers.
Google image "The Good Samaritan" by Aime  Morot LeBon

Time in the Word - Proper 10

Time in the Word
04-09 July 2022
Preparation for next week, Pentecost 5 – Proper 10
Fellowship with the Divine



Jesus Is Our Good Samaritan


The Law commands that “you shall love the Lord your God” with all your heart, soul, mind and strength (Luke 10:27), and that you shall “love your neighbor as yourself” (Leviticus 19:18). Love fulfills the Law because love does no harm to the neighbor. Christ Jesus is the Good Samaritan, who with divine compassion saves you from all evil. He takes your sin and death upon Himself and bears these in His body to the cross. He binds up your wounds with the healing balm of His Gospel, and He brings you into His Church, where He takes care of you at His own expense (Luke 10:34–35). By such mercy, He proves “to be a neighbor to the man who fell among the robbers” (Luke 10:36). Therefore, “you go, and do likewise” (Luke 10:37). By “your faith in Christ Jesus” and “because of the hope laid up for you in heaven” (Colossians 1:4–5), you have the same love for others as the Lord Jesus has for you.

For guidance in our callingLord God, You have called Your servants to ventures of which we cannot see the ending, by paths as yet untrodden, through perils unknown. Give us faith to go out with good courage, not knowing where we go but on that Your hand is leading us and Your love supporting us; through Jesus Christ, our Lord.


For steadfast faithAlmighty God, our heavenly Father, because of Your tender love toward us sinners You have given us Your Son that, believing in Him, we might have everlasting life. Continue to grant us Your Holy Spirit that we may remain steadfast in the faith to the end and finally come to love everlasting; through Jesus Christ, our Lord.

For newness of life in ChristAlmighty God, give us grace that we may cast away the works of darkness and put upon ourselves the armor of light now in the time of this mortal life in which Your Son, Jesus Christ, came to visit us in great humility, that in the Last Day, when He shall come again to glorious majesty to judge both the living and the dead, we may rise to life immortal; through Jesus Christ, our Lord.


Monday, 04 July 2022Psalm 136:23-26, antiphon Psalm 136:1 - Psalm 136 seems to be an expansion of Psalm 135, about God’s mighty works of Creation and in His dealings with Israel, arranged for antiphonal singing. The phrase “His mercy endures forever” occurs in every verse. It is called a “Hallel” Psalm, was sung at the opening of the Passover, and was a favorite Temple Song (see 1 Chronicles 16:41; 2 Chronicles 7:3; 20:21; Ezra 3:11) The description of God’s great works in creation (Vv.4-9) and in history (Vv.10-24) alternate with the people’s refrain to God’s unchanging timeless love.

Tuesday, 05 July 2022Psalm 41
This psalm is David’s pray for mercy when he was seriously ill. His enemies greet the prospect of his death with malicious glee. Even his once close friends betray his friendship see verse 9. Psalm 41 concludes a collection of four psalms connected by common themes, and also form the conclusion to the first section of the book of Psalms. (Psalms 1- 41) In its structure, the psalm is very symmetrical, composed of four stanzas of three verses each. The first and fourth stanzas frame the prayer with a note of confidence; stanzas two and three elaborate the prayer. Verse 13 is a doxology that closes Book I.

Wednesday, 06 July 2022— Leviticus 19:9-18 -
Obedience demanded from the Lord your God. Notice throughout the Old Testament reading that the people are reminded, “Speak to the Israelites and say to them: “I am the Lord your God.” (Leviticus 18:1) God’s people are given instructions concerning a morality reflecting God’s holiness. God was preparing His people for a life different from their pagan neighbors, whose life-style was deplorably immoral. Our lesson is an expansion of the Ten Commandments as the Lord gives detail as to how and why we must live. We live in obedience because of the relationship with have been given with our God.

Thursday, 07 July 2022Colossians 1:1-14 Obedience pleases God. In daily life we are accustomed to being transferred, and with each transfer we hope it means a promotion with larger salary. We may transfer schools. We may get a transfer at work from one department to another one. The company may transfer us to another city. In our Epistle Paul talks about the greatest transfer of all: from darkness to the light of God’s kingdom.
Everyone needs this transfer because we are born into the world of sin and need to be delivered. Has this transfer taken place in your life?


Friday, 08 July 2022Luke 10:25-37 -
Obedience leads to eternal life. The common understanding of a neighbor is one who lives close to you in a neighborhood. In today’s world this is not necessarily the case. Many do not even know even the name of the family who lives in the apartment down the hall, nor the couple living in the adjoining townhouse. Using this definition of “neighbor,” the lawyer was sure he was exempt from the law to love your neighbor. In the parable, Jesus gives a new understanding of a neighbor; he is one who is in need of your assistance given out of love.
 
Saturday, 09 July 2022 - Romans 3:23-25 –
The great hymn of faith “By Grace I’m Saved” (LSB 566). The glory God intended man to be is the glory that man had before the fall. (See Genesis 1:26-28; Psalm 8:5-6; Ephesians 4:24; Colossians 3:10. Believers in Christ will again have this glory through faith in Jesus Christ. (See Hebrews 2:5-9)


Sources:
Woodcut by Baron Julius Schnoor von Carolsfeld, 1794-1872, a distinguished German artist known especially for his book, Das Buch der Bücher in Bilden [The Book of Books in Pictures]) ©WELS.
Prayers from Lutheran Service Book © 2006 Concordia Publishing House
Collect for Eighth Sunday after Pentecost from Lutheran Worship © 1980 Concordia Publishing House
LECTIONARY PREACHING WORKBOOK SERIES C John Brokhoff © 1979 CSS Publishing, Lima, OH
Concordia Self Study Bible © 1886 Concordia Publishing House


Friday, July 1, 2022

Saturday prior to Proper 9

 


[1]

Sunday’s Hymn of the Day, Jesus Has Come and Brings Pleasure Eternal(LSB #533), is a majestic hymn of praise to Jesus. It proclaims Jesus as God in the flesh, as our great Deliverer, Redeemer, and the King of all glory.

The author of the hymn is Johann Ludwig Conrad Allendorf, who was born February 9, 1693, in Josbach in the province of Hesse, Germany. His father was a pastor in the small village. Johann went to the University of Giessen in 1711 and two years later studied under Francke, a German Lutheran clergyman and biblical scholar of the time. Johann was a tutor for Count Promnitz’s children at Sorau and was appointed Lutheran Court Preacher at Cothen when the Count’s daughter needed his services to marry a prince. When his services as a reformed preacher were no longer needed, Allendorf moved on to be an assistant in two churches in Wornigerode. In 1755 he became pastor at the Liebfrau Church and remained there until his death in 1773.

Pastor Allendorf wrote 45 hymns, most of which are still used primarily in German-speaking churches. His contributions are described as “hymns of love to Christ, the Lamb of God, and the Bridegroom of the believing Soul.”1 He penned this hymn while pastor at St. Ulrich’s Church in Halle. The words come from the following Bible passages:

Luke 1:68-79: Zechariah’s song in the temple after seeing the Christ child.

1 John 1:1-2: “That which was from the beginning, which we have heard, which we have seen with our eyes, which we have looked at and our hands have touched—this we proclaim concerning the Word of life.”

Isaiah 12: This song of praise and joy ends with the phrase, “Shout aloud and sing for joy, people of Zion, for great is the Holy One of Israel among you.”

 

The tune we use for this hymn is “Cothen” (sometimes spelled Kothen), which appears to have been named for the city where Allendorf first became a minister. This area is in Saxony-Anhalt, in the east central part of Germany. The original copyright for the tune is dated 1773, the year of Allendorf’s death, though it's now well into the public domain.

In America, this hymn is only in two hymnals, including that of the Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod. The hymn was in the Epiphany section of the blue Lutheran Worship hymnal. In the newer Lutheran Service Book, it is placed in the section “Redeemer”, thus encouraging congregations to use it throughout the church year. We will be learning this hymn through the remainder of our Epiphany season. We hope to also utilize it at other times as well, as we anticipate that many of you will be requesting it frequently! “Jesus Has Come and Brings Pleasure Eternal” is a classically beautiful hymn of praise and joy. Our worship will benefit, as will your hearts, from meditation on the words.[2]

Prayer for increase of the holy ministryAlmighty and gracious God, the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, You have commanded us to pray that You would send forth laborers into Your harvest. Of Your infinite mercy give us true teachers and ministers of Your Word who truly fulfill Your command and preach nothing contrary to Your holy Word. Grant that we, being warned, instructed, nurtured, comforted, and strengthened by Your holy Word, may do those things which are well pleasing to You and profitable for our salvation; through Jesus Christ, our Lord. Amen. [3]

Collect for Saturday of the week of Pentecost 4O God in whom we have our being, who in thy light hast revealed thyself unto us, but whom in our darkness we cannot comprehend grant that we may think worthily of thee as we ought to think, and may renew Thine image in us, but the grace of thy Holy Spirit, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen (Anonymous) [4]-02 July, 2022


[1] Lift High the Cross, copyright © Ed Riojas, Higher Things

[3] Collect for an increase of the holy ministry, Lutheran Service Book, © 2006 Concordia Publishing House, St. Louis

[4] Collect for Saturday of the week of Pentecost 4, For All the Saints, A Prayer Book For and By the Church, Vol. II © 1995, The American Lutheran Publicity Bureau, Delhi, NY


Thursday, June 30, 2022

Friday prior to Proper 9

 


Luke 10:1–20Our Lord desires all people to be saved and to come to the knowledge of the truth (1 Timothy 2:4). But how are people to believe in Jesus Christ, if they have not heard of Him, if they have not had the Gospel proclaimed to them? (Romans 10:14) In our Gospel reading for Sunday, we hear how Jesus sent out 72 men to proclaim the Good News of salvation in Christ Jesus. Likewise, He still calls pastors to labor in His harvest fields. As in the days of Christ, their labor is met by different responses: some people are eager to hear of the forgiveness of sins wrought by Christ’s death on the cross, whilst others reject it. The Day of Judgment will be a horrifying one for those who have refused the forgiveness Christ offers, but a glorious one for us who are in Christ, who gratefully receive His gift of salvation.

After this” (V.1) refers to the incidents in the preceding chapter. “The Lord appointed seventy others,” in addition to the twelve disciples who had already been sent on a similar mission. (Luke 9:1-2)  I send you out as lambs in the midst of wolves,” (v. 3) is a picture of the risks Christian preachers take, for they are seemingly weak and defenseless. Yet they are not to worry about their livelihood but are to work with a joyous abandon (v.4a) nor are they to dally in aimless conversation with individuals they meet. (V.4b)

Peace be to this house!” (Friedheim!) is more than a common salutation. It is an offer of divine peace, as is evident from V. 6 which describes the peace spoken of as resting on a son of peace.  “And remain in that some house,” (v.7) indicated that one house and family were to be selected as the center of the work.

The missionaries were also to eat whatever was set before them without fussing about clean or unclean foods. (Vv.7-8) To attest that they had been sent by the LORD with an offer of divine peace, they also headed the sick. (V.9)  God saw that this miraculous power was needed in the early days of the church. Those appointed hardly believe that they had such power, even after Christ had announced the gift to them. (V.17)  The reception of their message reflects the attitude of the hearers toward Christ Himself. (V.16)

A prayer for pastors and their peopleAlmighty God, by Your Son, our Savior, You have always given to Your Church on earth faithful shepherds to guide and feed Your flock. Therefore we pray, make all pastors diligent to preach Your holy Word and to administer Your means of grace, and grant Your people wisdom to follow in the way that leads to life eternal; through Jesus Christ, Your Son, our Lord, who lives and reigns with You and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever. [2]  Amen.

Prayer for Friday of the week of Pentecost 4:  Deliver us, O God, from our little fears, and spoil for us whatever confidence we have left in anything but Thy victory. [3] 01 July, 2022



[1] Lift High the Cross, copyright © Ed Riojas, Higher Things

[2] Lutheran Service Book © 2006 Concordia Publishing House, St. Louis

[3] Prayer for Friday of the week of Pentecost 4, For All the Saints, A Prayer Book For and By the Church, Vol. II © 1995 The American P=Lutheran Publicity bureau, Delhi, NY


Wednesday, June 29, 2022

Thursday prior to Proper 9

 

Galatians 6:1–10, 14–18—This Sunday, we shall celebrate our nation’s independence. Our political liberty and freedom is a gift from God. Yet, in the Church, we are not independent. We are member of one body, the mystical body of Christ (1 Corinthians 12:27). As such, we are not to live our lives for ourselves independent of others, but are to bear one another’s burdens. The strong Christians are to help the weak.

St Paul urges us, let us not grow weary of doing good, for we are a new creation in Christ, and, as such, our wills are conformed to God’s will, which desires what is best for all people.

Under the theme “The Nature of God’s Kingdom” the epistle lessons tells of life in the Kingdom on earth.

This lesson speaks especially about good works; to bear one another’s burden, to “forgive those who trespass against us,” to share all good things with him who teaches us. But the apostle Paul does not forget to make it clear that these good works come only from a “new creation” from those who are able to “sow to the Spirit.”

Te natural human impulse is to act, to judge one’s actions, and to approve or correct oneself. (The conscience)  For this reason it is so difficult for us to understand the impossible for us to believe that God forgives without our being able to correct our mistakes and to justify ourselves before God.  God has to change our minds and make us accept forgiveness by faith in Christ. (See 1 Corinthians 2:6-16)

Collect for the Pentecost SeasonAlmighty God, You have built Your Church on the foundation of the apostles and prophets with Christ Jesus Himself as the cornerstone. Continue to send Your messengers to preserve Your people in true peace that, by the preaching of Your Word, Your Church may be kept free from all harm and danger; through Jesus Christ, Your Son, our Lord, who lives and reigns with You and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever. Amen.[2]

Collect for Thursday of the week of Pentecost 4:  O thou who in almighty power wast weak and in perfect Excellency was lowly, grant unto us the same mind. All that we have which is our own is naught if we have any good in us it is wholly thy gift.  O Savior, since thou, the Lord of heaven and earth didst humble thyself, grant unto us true humility, and make us like thyself, and then, of thine infinite goodness, raise us to thine everlasting  glory; who livest and reignest with the Father and the Holy Ghost, forever and ever. Amen (Thomas Crammer) -[3]30 June, 2022



[1] Lift High the Cross, copyright © Ed Riojas, Higher Things

[2] Lutheran Service Book © 2006 Concordia Publishing House. St. Louis

[3] Collect for Thursday of the week of Pentecost 4, For All the Saints, A Prayer Book For and By the Church, Vol. II © 1995 The American Lutheran Publicity Bureau, Delhi, NY


Tuesday, June 28, 2022

Wednesday prior to Proper 9

 


Isaiah 66:10–14Those who remained faithful to the Lord during the days when Isaiah prophesied in Judah had reason to mourn over Jerusalem: hypocrisy, unbelief, and idolatry were common among the people. Likewise, through the ages, including our own, God’s faithful people have reason to mourn when they see the condition of the visible Church: rejection of the authority of the Word of God, acceptance of sins, rather than forgiveness of sins, being preached, and so on. Yet, we know that the gates of hell shall not prevail against the Lord’s Church (Matthew 16:18), so we can rejoice. We can rejoice, for the pure Gospel of Jesus Christ provides nourishment, comfort, and abundance for our souls. As a mother nurses her child, so we are nursed by the Holy Word of God.

Under the theme “The Nature of God’s Kingdom” Isaiah tells us of life in the New Jerusalem. There is reason to rejoice for God blesses her with prosperity and comfort.

The birth of a baby is a miracle, a wonder to behold. Thus, Isaiah begins this oracle with the exhortation to rejoice in Jerusalem. Don’t mourn for her! She is not dead! Her inhabitants have been carted off into long captivity in Babylon and it would seem that there is no life in her; yet she is very much alive. The LORD will cause her to bring forth sons who will rejoice in her.

Isaiah’s prophecy breaks into our gloom and doom with a startling announcement; Like Jerusalem of old, the LORD’s church is very much alive! Despite appearances, it is not yet time to mourn over her. The LORD has begotten a Son twice; once in eternity and once in time, as He sent His only begotten Son into the world that whoever believes in Him may have eternal life. And this Son has “given birth” to His Church. It is His church, it is His body. He has brought it into existence through His life, death and resurrection and He will maintain it and make it prosper. 

Collect for Proper 9: Almighty God, You have built Your Church on the foundation of the apostles and prophets with Christ Jesus Himself as the cornerstone. Continue to send Your messengers to preserve Your people in true peace that, by the preaching of Your Word, Your Church may be kept free from hard and danger; through Jesus Christ, Your Son, our Lord, who lives and reigns with You and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever.[2] Amen

Collect for Wednesday of the week of Pentecost 4: Almighty and everlasting God, give us an increase of faith, hope and love; and that we may obtain what you have promised, make us love what you have commanded; through Jesus Christ, your Son, our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever. Amen [3] -29 June, 2022


[1] Lift High the Cross, copyright © Ed Riojas, Higher Things

[2] Collect for Proper 9, Lutheran Service Book © 2006 Concordia Publishing House, St. Louis

[3] Collect for Wednesday of the week of Pentecost 4, For All the Saints, A Prayer Book For and By the Church, Vol. II © 1995 The American Lutheran Publicity Bureau, Delhi, NY


Monday, June 27, 2022

Tuesday prior to Proper 9

 

Psalm 66:1–7Psalm 66 calls upon all peoples of the earth to join in with God’s chosen people, Israel, in praising Him. His deliverance of His people from bondage in Egypt and the threat of Pharaoh and his army at the Red Sea is specifically recounted, but all of God’s deliverances of all His people are to be included, especially the deliverance of mankind from the bondage of sin, and the threat of death.

Psalm 66 – How everyone can praise God

This psalm is titled To the Chief Musician. A Song. A Psalm. As with Psalm 65, it is described as both a Song and a Psalm. This is the first psalm since Psalm 50 to not be attributed to David.

This Psalm is said to be recited on Easter day, by the Greek Church: it is described in the Greek Bible as A Psalm of the Resurrection, and may be understood to refer, in a prophetic sense, to the regeneration of the world, through the conversion of the Gentiles.[2]

Collect for Psalm 66: Almighty Father, you brought us through the waters of baptism to the shores of new life, accept the sacrifice of our lives, and let us enter your house, there to praise your unfailing power and love, through your Son, Jesus Christ our Lord. [3]   Amen

Collect for Tuesday of the week of Pentecost 4O God, from whom all good proceeds: Grant that by your inspiration we may think those things that are right, and by your merciful guiding may do them; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, forever and ever. Amen [4]- 28 June, 2022


[1] Lift High the Cross, copyright © Ed Riojas, Higher Things

[3] Collect for Psalm 66, For All the Saints, A Prayer Book For and By the Church, Vol. II © 1995 The American Lutheran Publicity Bureau, Delhi, NY

[4] ibid


Sunday, June 26, 2022

Monday prior to Proper 9

 

Psalm 19:2, 4–6; antiphon, Psalm 19:1—Many of the psalms praise the Lord for His deliverance from enemies, both mortal and spiritual. Psalm 19 is a hymn of praise to God because of the majesty and glory that are His by His very nature. The glory of God is revealed by the entire creation. Those who attribute the earth and the cosmos to mere happenstance are only deceiving themselves.

Psalm 19 – The heavens, the word, and the glory of God

The title tells us both the author and the audience of the psalm: To the Chief Musician. A Psalm of David. Some believe that the Chief Musician is the Lord GOD Himself, and others suppose him to be a leader of choirs or musicians in David’s time, such as Heman the singer or Asaph (1 Chronicles 6:33, 16:5-7, and 25:6).

This Psalm reflects, more than any other, the beauty and splendor of the Hebrew poetry found in the Psalter. C.S. Lewis wrote, ‘I take this to be the greatest poem in the Psalter and one of the greatest lyrics in the world.’[2]

The Lord restores Jerusalem, His Church, because she is the mother of His children, whom He comforts “as one whom his mother comforts” (Isaiah 66:13). We are “satisfied from her consoling breast” with the pure milk of the Word, and we “drink deeply with delight from her glorious abundance” (Isaiah 66:11). The messengers of Christ bestow such gifts upon His Church. For He sends them out “as lambs in the midst of wolves” (Luke 10:3), bearing in their bodies the sacrifice of His cross, by which “the kingdom of God has come near” (Luke 10:9, 11). Wherever He enters in with this Gospel, Satan is cast out and falls “like lightning from heaven” (Luke 10:18). Thus, we do not “boast except in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ” (Galatians 6:14). Rejoicing in this Gospel, we “bear one another’s burdens” in love, according to “the law of Christ” (Galatians 6:2). [3]

Collect for Psalm 19: Heavenly Father, you have filled the world with beauty., Open our eyes to see your gracious hand in all your works, that rejoicing in your whole creation, we may learn to serve you with gladness, for the sake of him through whom all things were made, your Son, Jesus Christ our Lord. [4]

Collect for Monday of the week of Pentecost 4: God of the universe, we worship you as Lord, God, ever close to us; we rejoice to call you Father. From this world’s uncertainty we look to your covenant. Keep us one in your peace, secure in your love. We ask this through Christ our Lord. Amen [5]-27 June, 2022


[1] Lift High the Cross, copyright © Ed Riojas, Higher Things

[3] Lectionary summary, LCMS commission on worship

[4] Collect for Psalm 19, For All the Saints, A Prayer Book For and By the Church, Vol. II © 1995 The American Lutheran Publicity Bureau, Delhi, NY

[5] Ibid


Proper 9 Series C (July 3 -9)



Proper 9 Series C
(July 3-9)

Isaiah 66:10–14
Galatians 6:1–10, 14–18
Luke 10:1–20

The Lord Grants Peace and Life to His Church

The Lord restores Jerusalem, His Church, because she is the mother of His children, whom He comforts “as one whom his mother comforts” (Is. 66:13). We are “satisfied from her consoling breast” with the pure milk of the Word, and we “drink deeply with delight from her glorious abundance” (Isaiah 66:11). The messengers of Christ bestow such gifts upon His Church. For He sends them out “as lambs in the midst of wolves” (Luke 10:3), bearing in their bodies the sacrifice of His cross, by which “the kingdom of God has come near” (Luke 10:9, 11). Wherever He enters in with this Gospel, Satan is cast out and falls “like lightning from heaven” (Luke 10:18). Thus, we do not “boast except in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ” (Galatians 6:14). Rejoicing in this Gospel, we “bear one another’s burdens” in love, according to “the law of Christ” (Galatians 6:2).


Almighty God, You have built Your church on the foundation of the apostles and prophets with Christ Jesus Himself as the cornerstone. Continue to send Your messengers to preserve Your people in true peace that, by the preaching of Your Word, Your Church may be kept free from harm and danger; through Jesus Christ Your Son, our Lord, who lives and reigns with You and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever.

How is Jesus trying to get us to see the world as He does?
How is His view different from other viewpoints that hold our attention?
How might this text influence the way we live our lives and live out our faith?

Jesus Sends Out the Seventy-Two
Luke 10:1-20

Luke 10:1
Μετὰ δὲ ταῦτα ἀνέδειξεν ὁ κύριος ]καὶ ἑτέρους ἑβδομήκοντα δύο καὶ ἀπέστειλεν αὐτοὺς ἀνὰ δύο δύο πρὸ προσώπου αὐτοῦ εἰς πᾶσαν πόλιν καὶ τόπον οὗ ἤμελλεν αὐτὸς ἔρχεσθαι. 



 After this the Lord appointed seventy-two others and sent them on ahead of him, two by two, into every town and place where he himself was about to go

 :1 - the 72 "others" links to the LXX text of Genesis 10 (nations descended from Noah) and the number of nations in Jewish thought. Christ's kingdom goes beyond the narrow boundaries of the Jewish nation extending to all the nations of the world. This mission has eschatological implications - the last days of OT prophecy have broken into the present evil age.

Luke 10:2
 ἔλεγεν δὲ πρὸς αὐτούς· Ὁ μὲν θερισμὸς πολύς, οἱ δὲ ἐργάται ὀλίγοι· δεήθητε οὖν τοῦ κυρίου τοῦ θερισμοῦ ὅπως ἐργάτας ἐκβάλῃ εἰς τὸν θερισμὸν αὐτοῦ.
And he said to them, “The harvest is plentiful, but the laborers are few. Therefore pray earnestly to the Lord of the harvest to send out laborers into his harvest.

:2 - a metaphor - of the harvest is usually used in Scripture for judgment - Jer. 51:33; Hos. 6:11; JL. 3:13; Rev.14:15  - here it is positive see Isa. 9:3, Ps.  126:5-6. The metaphor "mission is a harvest" still guides the church's thinking about missions today. See the petition, "Thy kingdom come." 

Luke 10:3
ὑπάγετε· ἰδοὺ ἀποστέλλω ὑμᾶς ὡς ἄρνας ἐν μέσῳ λύκων.

Go your way; behold, I am sending you out as lambs in the midst of wolves.


:3 - a comparison - The metaphor of GOD's people as lambs and YHWH as shepherd is common in the OT - Isa. 40:11; Ez34:11-31; Ps. 23:1; 79:13; 95:7 -  Isa.53:7 the servant of YHWH is "like a lamb led to slaughter."  This guides the church's thinking about our identity, what we are to expect from the world, what our relationship  to Jesus means.

Luke 10:4
 μὴ βαστάζετε βαλλάντιον, μὴ πήραν, μὴ ὑποδήματα, καὶ μηδένα κατὰ τὴν ὁδὸν ἀσπάσησθε.
Carry no moneybag, no knapsack, no sandals, and greet no one on the road.

:4 - instructions - do not always...in Africa the greeting lasts a long time...literally "how is your day?"  They are not to be begging on the street.

:5-13 - regulations and brief developments of themes -

Luke 10:5

εἰς ἣν δ’ ἂν εἰσέλθητε οἰκίαν πρῶτον λέγετε· Εἰρήνη τῷ οἴκῳ τούτῳ.
Whatever house you enter, first say, ‘Peace be to this house!’

:5 - Whichever house you enter say, "Friedheim"

Luke 10:6

καὶ ἐὰν ᾖ ἐκεῖ υἱὸς εἰρήνης, ἐπαναπαήσεται ἐπ’ αὐτὸν ἡ εἰρήνη ὑμῶν· εἰ δὲ μήγε, ἐφ’ ὑμᾶς ἀνακάμψει.

And if a son of peace is there, your peace will rest upon him. But if not, it will return to you.


:6 - the son of peace will not be destroyed in the face of rejection. You will not loose the peace which is yours.


Luke 10:7    

 ἐν αὐτῇ δὲ τῇ οἰκίᾳ μένετε, ἐσθίοντες καὶ πίνοντες τὰ παρ’ αὐτῶν, ἄξιος γὰρ ὁ ἐργάτης τοῦ μισθοῦ αὐτοῦ. μὴ μεταβαίνετε ἐξ οἰκίας εἰς οἰκίαν.
And remain in the same house, eating and drinking what they provide, for the laborer deserves his wages. Do not go from house to house.

:7 -  in that house remain, eating and drinking what they provide. The worker is worthy. Do not move from house to house.

Luke 10:8

καὶ εἰς ἣν ἂν πόλιν εἰσέρχησθε καὶ δέχωνται ὑμᾶς, ἐσθίετε τὰ παρατιθέμενα ὑμῖν,
Whenever you enter a town and they receive you, eat what is set before you.

:8 - and any city you enter eat what is set before you.  The rewards do come.

Luke 10:9

 καὶ θεραπεύετε τοὺς ἐν αὐτῇ ἀσθενεῖς, καὶ λέγετε αὐτοῖς· Ἤγγικεν ἐφ’ ὑμᾶς ἡ βασιλεία τοῦ θεοῦ.
Heal the sick in it and say to them, ‘The kingdom of God has come near to you.’

:9 - 72 heal the sick and proclaim the kingdom near - a foretaste of the salvation God Has promised. The kingdom is still near, but seems invisible now. We are still waiting for Jesus to appear again and tie up what appears to be a loose end. 

Luke 10:10

εἰς ἣν δ’ ἂν πόλιν εἰσέλθητε καὶ μὴ δέχωνται ὑμᾶς, ἐξελθόντες εἰς τὰς πλατείας αὐτῆς εἴπατε·
But whenever you enter a town and they do not receive you, go into its streets and say,

Luke 10:11

Καὶ τὸν κονιορτὸν τὸν κολληθέντα ἡμῖν ἐκ τῆς πόλεως ὑμῶν [l]εἰς τοὺς πόδας ἀπομασσόμεθα ὑμῖν· πλὴν τοῦτο γινώσκετε ὅτιἤγγικεν ἡ βασιλεία τοῦ θεοῦ.

‘Even the dust of your town that clings to our feet we wipe off against you. Nevertheless know this, that the kingdom of God has come near.’


:10-11 -  whatever city you enter and they do not welcome you go into the streets and say, "even the dust that's clinger to our feet we wipe off, except know this the kingdom of God has come here."

Luke 10:12

λέγω ὑμῖν ὅτι Σοδόμοις ἐν τῇ ἡμέρᾳ ἐκείνῃ ἀνεκτότερον ἔσται ἢ τῇ πόλει ἐκείνῃ.
I tell you, it will be more bearable on that day for Sodom than for that town.
            - Sodom, see judgment (Gen.19)

Woe to Unrepentant Cities

Luke 10:13

Οὐαί σοι, Χοραζίν· οὐαί σοι, Βηθσαϊδά· ὅτι εἰ ἐν Τύρῳ καὶ Σιδῶνι ἐγενήθησαν αἱ δυνάμεις αἱ γενόμεναι ἐν ὑμῖν, πάλαι ἂν ἐν σάκκῳ καὶ σποδῷ καθήμενοι μετενόησαν.
“Woe to you, Chorazin! Woe to you, Bethsaida! For if the mighty works done in you had been done in Tyre and Sidon, they would have repented long ago, sitting in sackcloth and ashes.

:14-15 - lamentation -


Luke 10:14

πλὴν Τύρῳ καὶ Σιδῶνι ἀνεκτότερον ἔσται ἐν τῇ κρίσει ἢ ὑμῖν
But it will be more bearable in the judgment for Tyre and Sidon than for you.
            
- Tyre/Sidon known for idolatry and resistance to YHWH .

Luke 10:15

καὶ σύ, Καφαρναούμ,  μὴ ἕως οὐρανοῦ ὑψωθήσῃ; ἕως τοῦ ᾅδου καταβιβασθήσῃ.
And you, Capernaum, will you be exalted to heaven? You shall be brought down to Hades.

:15 Capernaum see language uttered against Babylon in Isa.14:12-15. Yet the judgment spoken by Jesus is a future yet to come. Jesus uses eschatological language of judgment that waits fulfillment.

Luke 10:16

Ὁ ἀκούων ὑμῶν ἐμοῦ ἀκούει, καὶ ὁ ἀθετῶν ὑμᾶς ἐμὲ ἀθετεῖ· ὁ δὲ ἐμὲ ἀθετῶν ἀθετεῖ τὸν ἀποστείλαντά με.
“The one who hears you hears me, and the one who rejects you rejects me, and the one who rejects me rejects him who sent me.”

:16 - a wisdom saying -


The Return of the Seventy-Two
Luke 10:17

Ὑπέστρεψαν δὲ οἱ ἑβδομήκοντα δύο μετὰ χαρᾶς λέγοντες· Κύριε, καὶ τὰ δαιμόνια ὑποτάσσεται ἡμῖν ἐν τῷ ὀνόματί σου. 
The seventy-two returned with joy, saying, “Lord, even the demons are subject to us in your name!”    

:17 - an apocalyptic tone - the 72 rejoice in their success expressed in terms of healing and exorcism not conversion . Satan still exerts his power in this age. Satan has fallen, yet he prowls like a lion. Both are true, a tension that awaits resolution.

Luke 10:18

εἶπεν δὲ αὐτοῖς· Ἐθεώρουν τὸν Σατανᾶν ὡς ἀστραπὴν ἐκ τοῦ οὐρανοῦ πεσόντα.

And he said to them, “I saw Satan fall like lightning from heaven.


Luke 10:19

ἰδοὺ δέδωκα ὑμῖν τὴν ἐξουσίαν τοῦ πατεῖν ἐπάνω ὄφεων καὶ σκορπίων, καὶ ἐπὶ πᾶσαν τὴν δύναμιν τοῦ ἐχθροῦ, καὶ οὐδὲν ὑμᾶς οὐ μὴ [u]ἀδικήσῃ.
Behold, I have given you authority to tread on serpents and scorpions, and over all the power of the enemy, and nothing shall hurt you.

:19 - a juridical tone -

Luke 10:20

πλὴν ἐν τούτῳ μὴ χαίρετε ὅτι τὰ πνεύματα ὑμῖν ὑποτάσσεται, χαίρετε δὲ ὅτι τὰ ὀνόματα ὑμῶν ἐγγέγραπται ἐν τοῖς οὐρανοῖς.
Nevertheless, do not rejoice in this, that the spirits are subject to you, but rejoice that your names are written in heaven.”

:20 - an opportunity to talk about the significance of baptism for the certainty of salvation. Our names are written gives assurance that God will not forget about us. The words we hear in absolution and communion God Is speaking to each of us "Your name is written in heaven. Rejoice!

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